Call us in the MORNING...we'll get you in TODAY—GUARANTEED!

Our Blog

Teething: When to Expect a Baby’s First Tooth

June 9th, 2018

Probably you don’t need to know the signs and symptoms of a teething baby. The most obvious sign that a child’s first tooth is coming into his or her mouth are irritability and restlessness. The baby may have difficulty sleeping at night, and he or she may seem distracted and confused during the day. It’s easy to see why this entirely natural process is irritating and possibly even painful: a baby is born with all twenty of his or her baby teeth already below the gum line, and when those teeth sprout they literally push up through the gum tissue.

When to Expect a Baby’s First Tooth

A baby will typically begin to sprout his or her teeth between the ages of 6 and 12 months; he or she could begin sooner or even later than that, but this is a good guideline. Once the baby has begun the teething process he or she will continue to sprout all twenty teeth by the time he or she is around three years old.

Normal Baby Teething Symptoms

A baby who is teething will be naturally fussy. They will have trouble sleeping occasionally, and the loss in sleep could escalate his or her fussiness during the day. It is also normal for a baby to have a decreased appetite while teething.

Not Normal Symptoms

A fever is not a common symptom of teething. A baby’s fever could be caused by any number of reasons and should not be ignored. Also, diarrhea and a rash are not direct signs of teething alone, and if the condition persists you should contact your baby’s pediatrician.

Alleviate Symptoms of Teething

Oftentimes a baby’s symptoms can be alleviated or at the very least lessened in intensity by applying a cool cloth to the gum tissue; place your finger inside the cloth and gently massage the baby’s gums. A clean teething ring can also bring some comfort to a teething baby.

When a baby develops teeth it’s time for his or her first visit to the dentist. Oftentimes, bringing a child to the dentist early in his or her life will lessen the potential anxieties of going as they get older.  Call Premiere Dental today!

National Mouth Guard Awareness: Take Care of That Healthy Smile

May 10th, 2018

Sports are fun and highly valued in our communities even though participation in them comes with certain risks of injury. Mouth injuries and sports, unfortunately, go hand in hand: baseballs, basketballs, soccer balls, hockey pucks, and people’s elbows, knees, helmets, etc., all are potential tooth dislodgement devices. Luckily, however, your dentist at Premier Smile can custom fit a mouth guard that, if properly worn, will lessen the risk of injury.

A mouth guard minimizes the risk of a broken or cracked tooth, because the mouth guard helps to cushion the blow of a strike. But this only works if the mouth guard is worn properly. Oftentimes we see athletes with mouth guards in the corners of their mouth, chewing on the ends. They may not even realize they are doing it, but if they were to get hit that mouth guard isn’t going to protect their teeth.

When to Wear a Mouth Guard

A Mouth Guard should be worn in any sport—although not every sport requires one—where there is an inherent risk of injury to the teeth. From a very early age children should be encouraged to wear mouth guards when participating in certain sports; the earlier the better so that the child gets used to the mouth guard early. Sports such as Football and Martial Arts, Hockey and Lacrosse, usually all require the use of a mouth guard to participate. But that isn’t to say that someone can’t have major dental damage when they fall doing gymnastics or catch an elbow by another kid at a soccer game.

Types of Mouth Guards

Any mouth guard can be custom fitted by your dentist at Premier Smile. If you purcase an entirely customized mouth guard, it can be created and molded for that perfect comfortable fit—kids who wear braces may appreciate the comfortable feel of a custom fit mouth guard. You can also use the standard “boil and bite” style of mouth guard. But make sure if you choose this style of mouth guard that you precisely follow the manufacturer’s instructions to achieve that perfect fit.

If you have any other questions, or would like to schedule an appointment to have your child fitted with a mouth guard, call Premier Smile today.

Proper Nutrition And Dental Health

April 8th, 2018

We all have probably heard that consuming overly-sugary foods and beverages can lead to tooth decay, but did you also know that your mouth is likely to be the first place to indicate signs of poor nutrition? It’s true. Evidence of poor nutrition is evident, usually, within the mouth before it shows in areas of the body. Everything you eat and drink has an impact, no matter how small or how brief, on your dental health.

Nutrition depends on many things; to consider nutrition per the recommended guidelines developed by the Department of Agriculture, a person’s nutrition depends on age, gender, level of activity, and other inherent health factors. This means that calories and other dietary restrictions are based on several different factors, and that no two people are exactly alike, but everyone’s diet should have balance and moderation. For instance, unless a person has certain dietary restrictions that prevent it, people should consume lots of fruits and vegetables. Also, grains are important—of course, again, this depends on dietary restrictions—and foods such as oatmeal, whole wheat bread, and brown rice are an especially important part of our diet. Dairy should be low-fat and limited to moderation, and foods that are rich in protein such as fish and skinless meat—remember that certain meats can be hard on the body and should be consumed in moderation—but also protein-rich foods such as legumes—i.e. beans and lentils.

While a diet is an incredibly important aspect to full body health, quality dental health depends also on several other factors that include: the frequency a person eats—regular snacking is not recommended, because it’s hard to keep the teeth clean—the combinations of foods a person consumes in one sitting, and any other conditions—gastrointestinal problems and systemic diseases such as diabetes—which may alter the way our bodies process food.

Remember, our mouths are one of many of the components to full body health, and oral health is not only about just twice daily brushings one once daily flossing—although these are very, very important components.

Oral Care For Your Baby

March 5th, 2018

A baby needs his or her gums and initial teeth cleaned as frequently as his or her parents. It’s not true that because a baby is going to receive a new set of adult teeth that the health of baby teeth can simply be ignored. Plaque begins to form on a baby’s gum line as soon as he or she takes that first bit of milk or formula into his or her mouth. To clean a baby’s gums, even before his or her baby teeth have sprouted, use a soft, damp cloth and gently massage the baby’s gum line. You can begin to do this just a few days after birth, and continue with it until a child has sprouted all his or her baby teeth.

When a child gets his or her first tooth then it’s time to brush. Use a tiny amount of toothpaste—a toothpaste that’s meant for small children (if you have any questions as to the types of child toothpastes then talk to your child’s dentist at Premier Smile)—the amount of toothpaste used should be in an amount that’s comparable to a grain of rice—small. Massage the child’s tooth or teeth with a child-sized toothbrush twice a day. Keep a tooth brushing routine and the child will begin to adopt the habit as they grow.

As the child gets older, and he or she has a mouth full of teeth, you can begin to up the dosage of toothpaste—in an amount no larger than a pea—and he or she can help you brush his or her teeth. As the child gets older and more autonomous you can have the child brush his or her own teeth, but until the child is autonomous enough to handle the entire process, alone, you should still be present to supervise.

Also remember that a child’s first dental visit should happen early. Plan on bringing your child into Premier Smile so that he or she may not only have their teeth cleaned and examined, but he or she will also experience the dentist’s office; hopefully, in giving them a proper introduction to the dentist they will be less likely to develop a fear or anxiety.

sesame logoWebsite Powered by Sesame 24-7