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Holidays

Holiday Candy Season… Survival Guide

November 8th, 2018

Halloween has come and gone, but that doesn’t mean that it’s the end of the candy season. There are plenty of opportunities to imbibe sweets—both of the candy and pastry/cookie variety—throughout the next few months. And while those sweets are delicious and fun, there are many reasons to either consume in moderation or, in some cases, avoid some sweets entirely. Here’s why…

Sugar is an enemy to teeth, but it’s not the sugar, it’s the bacteria which feed on the sugar. The bacteria in your mouth love sugar, probably even more than you do, and as bacteria consume sugar they produce a weak acid that harms teeth. That acid is the cause of cavities.

If You’re Gonna Eat Candy Then Eat…

Chocolate! In moderation chocolate is one of the better types of candy for your teeth (there is absolutely NO candy that is actually good for your teeth). The reason? Because chocolate washes from the teeth. Some types of candies form a film or remain sticky, but chocolate can be washed away by saliva and water. But that isn’t to say that there is no damage done: the bacteria are still provided sugar and the teeth should be cleaned. And if you’re going to eat chocolate, then know that most brands of non-milk chocolate are lower in overall sugar than milk chocolate.

Sticky and Gummy (Candy, Carmel Apples, and the Like).

Try to stay away from sweet treats that are sticky or gummy. These types of sweets are more difficult to remove–some hardier-types can hide between the teeth even after a vigorous brushing (for instance, if you are going to consume popcorn balls you should floss immediately because some of the kernels can become tightly wedged between the teeth)—and the long length of time it takes to dissolve or remove the sugar from the mouth gives the bacteria more time to consume the sugars and produce harmful acids.

Have a wonderful start to the holiday season, and enjoy the sweet treats, but remember to enjoy them in moderation, and to clean your teeth whenever possible.

Happy Holidays!

December 5th, 2017

The holiday season is a hard time for teeth; if for no other reason than the perpetual snacking: parties, an office get-together, gift boxes of candies, platters of cookies and other sugary treats, champagne and/or sugary ciders (beverages like Martinelli’s sparkling cider are often overlooked as being bad for teeth). The holiday season is a lot of fun. And, no, you don’t have to entirely abstain from sugary foods over the holiday season, but you do need to be mindful, and you will need to continue your daily oral care routine of brushing at least twice—sometimes more but we’ll get to that in a moment—and flossing at least once.

Being Mindful

There are so many delicious food options during the holiday season that it can be overwhelming. Remember, your teeth need adequate time to recover from eating and drinking beverages—all except for plain water. If you are snacking on delicious food all day everyday throughout the next month or so, then your teeth, and the natural systems your mouth has to fight against cavities—i.e. saliva—won’t be given adequate time to do the job.

Have a plan. If you are going to be attending a holiday party in the middle of the day—i.e. that yearly potluck-style party at the office where everyone brings in platters of cookies and other baked goods, candies—then pack with you a toothbrush and toothpaste. Clean your teeth after such an event. Yes, your mouth can handle quite a lot, but don’t overdo it. Brushing after the midafternoon party, for approximately two minutes, you can get your mouth back into shape.

Remember to avoid chewing hard candies, always. Not only can a hard candy potentially crack a tooth, it can remain stuck in the gaps between teeth and on a tooth’s surface, doing its sugary damage for long periods before finally being dissolved by saliva.

We hope you have a happy holiday season, and we hope that through all your enjoyments you will be mindful of your eating habits and keep to a quality oral care routine.

Why Premier Dental Hosts 4th Annual Candy Buy Back...

November 2nd, 2017

Holidays and Sugar
Halloween has come and gone, yet the candy lingers. We know the amount of sugar presented to kids at this holiday and most is absurd, and we know that excess sugar leads to tooth decay and a whole host of other issues (you can read about : Ten Ways Sugar is Hurting Your Kids ). Unfortunately, many of our American traditions involve copious amounts of sugar!
  • Birthdays = Cake
  • Easter = Chocolate Eggs & Jelly Beans
  • Christmas = Cookies & Candies
  • Independence Day = BBQ (full of sugar!) & Ice Cream
  • Thanksgiving = Pumpkin Pie
  • And of course, Halloween = Candy
Learning Moderation: Spacing out the candy stash for a specific amount of time can help parents keep within the 3-6 teaspoons of sugar a day recommended by the American Heart Association*. The typical U.S. child eats around 20 or more teaspoons a day, so getting your kids within the recommended amounts most likely means you will have to take sugar out of the rest of your kids meals and snacks. Think: no juice, no soda, no sugar snacks, no honey, no syrup those days. This might be hard, but it will teach not only moderation, but also trade-offs, which are a big part of life.
Giving/Sharing: Keeping only the candy your children really love, and giving the rest away, will reward them twofold: First, the brain enjoys things more when it is not overwhelmed by too many choices and when the so-so options are weeded out. (We actually get less enjoyment when our candy stashes are peppered with mediocre candies.) Give away any candy that is not in your kids' top 10 sweets, and they will be even happier with what is left. Second, giving candy away will also teach charity and sharing.
Premier Dental is hosting their 4th annual Halloween Candy Buy Back on November 6th, 2017. Kids are encouraged to bring in their candy and receive cash and register for prizes. The candy is donated to the U.S. service men and women! It's a definite win-win.  Premier Dental has also partnered with two local schools, Rohwer Elementary and Sandoz Elementary to collect candy and donate the money to the school. The kids get a prize for donating, the school earns money and the candy is out of the hands/mouths of kids.

Halloween

October 5th, 2017

Halloween. It’s that time of year again! Now, obviously, your dentist is not going to recommend you binge out on candy. No person’s teeth can handle an overabundance of sugars. You might be wondering, however, why is sugary candy so, so bad for your teeth? The answer involves bacteria. Bacteria love the abundance of sugars in candy, and while they devour the sugars in your mouth they produce an acid that wears at tooth enamel and creates cavities.

Chocolate

Chocolate is one of the best candies for teeth, because the excess debris that gets left behind is more easily washed away naturally by saliva. The better the chocolate than the lower the artificial sugar content—at least, that’s usually true (dark chocolate has considerably less sugar than milk chocolate).

Sticky Candies and Hard Candies

No, no, sticky candies. Sticky candies make it difficult for the mouth to wash away the sugar. They stick to the surfaces of the teeth and encapsulate the tooth like a sugary cap. Not good.

Sticky candies are essentially setting up bacteria colonies. When chewed, hard Candies can easily chip or crack a tooth.

Halloween Treats

There are many Halloween-time extras that are delicious; delicious, but bad for your teeth. Caramel apples are a wonderful tasting Halloween treat, however the caramel that surrounds the apple is very bad for your teeth. Caramel may be the worst sticky treat you can chew. Caramel is terrible for your teeth. If you do partake in a caramel apple, make sure that you both brush and floss your teeth soon after. Popcorn balls are another seasonal favorite. Popcorn balls are usually held together by some type of sticky, sugary substance—somewhat comparable to caramel. Popcorn balls are also usually hard and can damage teeth in a way similar to hard candy. Also, the corn kernels may get stuck between teeth or in the spaces between a tooth and the gum line; if you do eat a popcorn ball, then make sure you brush and floss.

Stay safe this Halloween, and keep to your good oral health practices.  If you need to make your next appointment, make sure to call Premier Smile today.

Holidays and Dental Care

November 6th, 2016

It’s an important time of year. It’s the time of year for fun, family, and food. And in our feasting it’s important to remember to continue with regular routine dental care, especially at a time at which we feast on turkey, stuffing, cookies, pies, etc. It’s important to remember to keep up on our regular brushings, twice daily, and a regular flossing, once daily. And, for those of you who don’t floss regularly, or who need some advice on the proper way to do it, Thanksgiving is an excellent time to practice quality oral care with the abundance of sugary foods we consume, the amount of snacking most of us do, and, also, the types of foods we eat at Thanksgiving (turkey, stuffing, etc.), which can lodge easily between our teeth and gums, requiring a thorough flossing. So, here’s a few tips to flossing this holiday season.

First, we all know how important flossing is: like brushing, it removes the buildup of plaque and other bad things from the spaces between our teeth, by reaching in those hard-to-reach-spots that a toothbrush’s bristles can’t clean. So, it’s important at the tail end of the day, to thoroughly floss the spaces between our teeth (you can floss either before you brush or after, as long as you do both thoroughly, it’s going to be effective) and, also, at the times after a big meal, like at Thanksgiving.

To floss, use whatever tool you wish—picks, flossing tools, standard spool of floss. The tools are self-explanatory, but, if you are using floss from a spool, simply take a strand of it—a longish strand, think 8-12 inches—and wrap the tag ends of it around the tips of your fingers, and then place the taught floss between them into the spaces between the teeth, and, keeping the floss taught between your fingers, use a back and forth rocking motion, similar to how you would clean a tooth with a toothbrush, and scrub the spaces between the teeth and gums. Do this for every tooth, then throw the floss away. It’s that simple.
Remember, don’t suffer through dental pain. Call us TODAY (402) 718-8737 to schedule your appointment today!
Have a fantastic Thanksgiving, and remember to keep up on your dental care!

9 Tricks for Halloween Safety

October 26th, 2016

Halloween can be a spooky fun time for kids and their families. Below is mnemonic to help you prepare for Halloween safety:

Hazards can be avoided on Halloween by taking the following precautions.

Adults or older children should accompany young ghosts and goblins on their Halloween hauntings.

Light-reflecting costumes or orange reflecting tape will ensure everyone can be seen by drivers.

Look both ways before crossing the street, and obey all traffic safety rules. Walk, don't run, to avoid fractures to little skeletons.

October can be cold and damp; find a flame-retardant costume that provides protection from the weather.

Work your own neighborhood. There will be fewer tricks among the treats from people you know. Avoid any areas of the neighborhood you are not familiar with.

Eyes work best when not blocked by masks or patches. Best to choose face paint when you can instead of masks which may obstruct a child's vision.

Every piece of candy should be checked by a parent for tampering. Throw away all unpackaged goodies.

Never go trick or treating alone, and always say thank you!

Stop by and see us Monday, October 31st! All kids in costumes will receive a treat!

Third Annual Premier Dental Candy Buy Back

October 24th, 2016

Premier Dental is hosting their third annual candy buy back Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 from 3pm until 7pm. Last year Premier Dental collected over 700 pounds of candy for our troops!

We welcome all kids to bring in their unopened Halloween candy and turn it into cash. Premier Dental will be giving kids $1 per pound of candy, with a 5 pound maximum. All candy will be donated to our U.S. Service Men & Women! All kids who participate will receive a gift as well as an entry into our prize drawings!

We hope to see you there!

Thanksgiving

November 24th, 2015

At Premier Dental, we love to celebrate the holidays with vigor! Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke would love to share some unique ways of celebrating Thanksgiving from beyond the Omaha, NE area to the national level!

When Americans sit down to dinner on the last Thursday of November, the day that Abraham Lincoln designated as the day on which Thanksgiving would be celebrated, they do so thinking that the first Thanksgiving feast was held at Plymouth in 1621. According to National Geographic, the Spanish explorer Francisco Vásquez Coronado and his men celebrated a feast of Thanksgiving in Texas in 1541, giving Texas the distinction of being the first place where Thanksgiving was celebrated.

Different Types of Celebrations

Native Americans had rituals around which they celebrated in hopes of ensuring a bountiful harvest. The Cherokees had a Green Corn Dance that they did for this very purpose. The Pilgrims (not to be confused with the Puritans,) rejected any type of public religious display. They held a three-day long non-religious Thanksgiving feast. Although they said grace, the focus of their celebration was on feasting, drinking alcohol (they did have beer,) and playing games.

The Pilgrims at the Plymouth Plantation celebrated a different day of Thanksgiving in 1623. Plagued by a crop-destroying drought, the settlers prayed for relief. They even fasted. A few days later, they got the rain they so desperately needed. Soon thereafter, they received another blessing when Captain Miles Standish came with staples they couldn't otherwise get. He also told them that a Dutch supply ship was en route. In gratitude for the abundance of good fortune, the Plymouth settlers celebrated a day of prayer and Thanksgiving on June 30, 1623.

The Story of Squanto

No discussion of Thanksgiving is complete without a discussion of Squanto, or Tisquantum, as he was known among his people, the Patuxet Indians. It is believed that he was born sometime around 1580. As he returned to his village after a long journey, he and several other Native Americans were kidnapped by Jamestown colonist, Thomas Hunt. Hunt put them on a ship heading to Spain where they were to be sold into slavery.

As fate would have it, some local friars rescued him and many of the other kidnapped natives. Squanto was educated by the friars. Eventually, after asking for freedom so he could return to North America, he ended up in London where he spent time working as a ship builder. By 1619, he was finally able to get passage on a ship headed to New England with other Pilgrims.

Upon arriving at Plymouth Rock, he learned that his entire tribe was wiped out by diseases that accompanied earlier settlers from Europe. In gratitude for passage on their ship, he helped them set up a settlement on the very land where his people once lived. They called the settlement Plymouth. Since they knew nothing about how to survive, let alone how to find food, Squanto taught them everything, from how to plant corn and other crops, how to fertilize them, how and where to get fish and eels and much more.

After a devastating winter during which many settlers died, thanks to Squanto's teaching, they had an abundant harvest. After that harvest, they honored him with a feast. It is this feast of 1621 which was celebrated between the Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians that is widely considered the first Thanksgiving celebration.

About the Meal of the Plymouth Settlers

Surviving journals of Edward Winslow that are housed at Plymouth Plantation indicate that the first Thanksgiving feast was nothing like what Americans eat today. The meal consisted of venison, various types of wild fowl (including wild turkey,) and Indian corn. There were no cranberries, stuffing, pumpkin pie, potatoes, or any of the other “traditional” foods that appear on modern menus.

Today, Thanksgiving is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November, the day that Abraham Lincoln designated as the holiday. It is still a day of feasting, and for some, a day of prayer and thanksgiving. For others, it is a celebration of gathering, especially for families. Still others may celebrate in entirely different ways, including watching college football bowl games, or by playing family games.

If you ever wonder why you're so tired after the Thanksgiving meal, it's because turkey contains an amino acid, tryptophan, and it sets off chemicals whose chain reaction combine to make people sleepy.

And if you have a medical flex savings account, now is the time to use it or you lose it.

Halloween: Candy, costumes, and more!

October 27th, 2015

Halloween: Candy, costumes, and more! - Holiday Family Dentist Omaha NE

All Hallows' Eve, more commonly known as Halloween, is a yearly event celebrated on October 31, and one that is anticipated by the young and young at heart all over the world. Some scholars claim that Halloween originated from Celtic festivals that honored the dead or that celebrated the harvest, while others doubt that there's any connection at all to Samhain (a Gaelic harvest festival.) Regardless of its origin, our team at the dental office of Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke hopes that Halloween is fun and enjoyed by all of our awesome patients!

Trick or treat?

In North America, Halloween is predominantly celebrated by children who dress up in costumes, which range from scary to cute, who then go around the neighborhood knocking on doors asking "trick or treat", and they are given candy in return. Trick-or-treating is a time honored tradition, and though many parents groan at the pounds and pounds of candy collected by youngsters and fear for the health of their teeth, there are a few things you can do to help their teeth stay in great shape until the candy is gone:

  • Limit the amount of candy they can consume each day
  • Have them brush their teeth after eating candy
  • Avoid hard, chewy candies as they can stick in hard to brush places
  • Keep candy out of sight to reduce temptation
  • Don't buy candy too far in advance to limit pre-Halloween consumption
  • Help or encourage your children to floss

Halloween Fun

Halloween isn't just about gorging on candy; there are other events associated with this festive day including carving jack-o'-lanterns, painting pumpkins, decorating sugar cookies, bobbing for apples, going to haunted houses, or just curling up on the couch with a bowl full of popcorn and watching some classic, scary movies.

Halloween Around the World

Some countries, like Australia, frown upon Halloween, claiming it is an American event and not based in Australian culture, while others like Italy have embraced the fun and celebrate much as Canadians and Americans do. Mexicans have been celebrating this fun day since around 1960, and it marks the beginning of the Day of the Dead festival. Some countries in Europe have come late to the party, but since the 1990s, countries like Sweden, Norway, and Germany have started celebrating Halloween as well, and finding children in costumes or having ghosts hanging in windows has become commonplace.

Halloween is about fun; stepping outside our normal lives and donning a costume or gathering with friends to knock on doors and ask for candy is as much a part of our culture as hot dogs and barbecue on Labor Day. Have a safe and happy Halloween from the team at Premier Dental!

Halloween Candy Buy-Back!

October 8th, 2015

We will be holding our Halloween Candy Buy-Back event on November 2! Plan to join us to earn some extra money and help us give our troops a holiday treat!

Halloween Candy Buy-Back! - Holiday, Family Dentist, Candy Buy Back Omaha NE

Happy Fourth of July

June 30th, 2015

Happy Fourth of July - Holidays Omaha NE

Every year, Americans all over the world celebrate the birth of the country and its independence on the Fourth of July. There are countless ways that people celebrate and they range from community parades and large scale gatherings to concerts, fireworks displays, and smaller scale celebrations among family and friends. For some people, July 4th is synonymous with baseball, while for others it is all about the beach of barbecues. However you celebrate, you can be sure that red, white, and blue is visible everywhere throughout the area.

The Beginnings of Fourth of July Celebrations

Although it wasn't officially designated as a federal holiday until 1941, the actual tradition of celebrating Independence Day goes back to the time of the American Revolution (1775 – 1783). At the time of the American Revolution, representatives from the 13 colonies penned the resolution that ultimately declared their independence from Great Britain. The continental congress voted to adopt the Declaration of Independence on July 2nd of 1776. Two days later, Thomas Jefferson's famous document that is now known as the Declaration of Independence, was adopted by delegates representing the 13 colonies.

First States to Recognize the Fourth of July

In 1781, Massachusetts became the first state (or commonwealth) whose legislature resolved to designate July 4th as the date on which to celebrate the country's independence. Two years later, Boston became the first city to make an official designation to honor the country's birth with a holiday on July 4th. In that same year, North Carolina's governor, Alexander Martin, became the first governor to issue an official state order stipulating that July 4th was the day on which North Carolinians would celebrate the country's independence.

Fun Facts About the Fourth of July

  • The reason the stars on the original flag were arranged in a circle is because it was believed that would indicate that all of the colonies were equal.
  • Americans eat over 150 million hot dogs on July 4th.
  • Imports of fireworks each year totals over $211 million.
  • The first “official” Fourth of July party took place at the White House in 1801.
  • Benjamin Franklin didn't want the national bird to be the bald eagle. He believed that the turkey was better suited to the coveted distinction. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson disagreed with him, and he was outvoted, so the bald eagle became the official bird of the United States.

For many, the tradition is something entirely different. Along the coastal areas of the United States, people may haul out huge pots to have lobster or other types of seafood boils. Others may spend the day in the bleachers at a baseball game, or at a park, cooking a great traditional meal over an open fire. No matter how or where you celebrate, one thing is certain: all Americans celebrate July 4th as the birth and independence of our country.

Drs. Beninato, Larson, Berry, and Bost and our team at Premier Dental wish you a safe and happy Fourth of July!

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