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Oral Surgery Omaha NE

Dental Anxiety: How to Stop Fearing the Dentist Office

June 8th, 2019

If you are someone who gets nervous about a trip to the dentist then know that you are far from alone; thousands admit to fearing the dentist’s office. Unfortunately, this can mean that a person’s fear of the dentist will keep him or her from coming in for a twice-yearly checkup. And those checkups are as important to a person’s dental health as brushing twice daily and flossing once. To prolong a visit to the dentist’s office means a greater risk of developing dental conditions that, if left untreated, could become serious. So here are a few tips to better cope with the fear of a visit to the dentist’s office.

The number one way to deal with a fear of the dentist is to tell your dentist at Premier Smile of your anxieties/fears. Your dentist can better treat you if you explain everything; remember to include any stories of bad experiences. Ask your dentist for strategies to help you while you spend time in the chair. And remember to discuss with your dentist and the dental team an agreed-upon signal you plan to use if the situation becomes overly stressful.

You may also want to plan to distract yourself from the exam. If you are someone who has fears and anxieties upon hearing the sound of the drill, then you may want to wear headphones. You could also find ways of occupying your hands to deflect some of the nervousness you feel.

Last but not least, you can participate in mindful techniques. Use techniques such as deep breathing to help relax the tensions you may feel in your body.

If you have been unable to schedule your next dental appointment with your dentist at Premier Smile, then call today. Remember to explain that you do have certain anxieties about visiting the dentist so that the dental team at Premier Smile can better accommodate your needs.

Flossing

February 11th, 2019

Flossing is an important component for dental health, and here’s why. First, flossing cleans the plaque between our teeth. In most cases these spaces are too narrow for the bristles of a toothbrush to clean adequately. So, uncleaned, plaque is allowed to thrive within those spaces, potentially causing cavities and gum disease. Remember that plaque contains certain bacteria that feed on the food and sugar present in the mouth; the bacteria produce an acid that eats away at the surface of the tooth, and causes a cavity. Also, the unremoved plaque can eventually harden into a hard substance called tarter. And tarter around the gum line is a catalyst for gum disease.

There’s been some recent speculation about the effectiveness of floss to clean between teeth; if the practice of flossing is a necessity, or if appropriate brushing habits are enough to clean plaque. But even the U.S Health and Human Services Dept. has stated that the act of flossing is an important hygiene practice.

And floss is the first thing to reach for in the event you find something stuck between your teeth. According to several studies, folks will reach for almost anything when they find something; the tip of a knife and credit cards are listed as a few of the tooth cleaning devices someone could, unfortunately, reach for.

There is no one perfect time in the day to floss. In fact, it doesn’t make much difference if you floss before or after brushing; it doesn’t matter whether you floss in the morning or at night. The important thing is that it gets done. If you find you are too rushed to remember to brush your teeth in the morning, then it may be best to set it to your evening brushing routine. Or, if you find yourself too tired in the evening to spend time flossing, then you may want to brush in the morning, or set aside some time at the lunch hour.

If you have any questions about flossing, or are ready to schedule your next appointment with your dentist at Premier Smile, then call today.

Fluoride: Nature’s Cavity Fighter

September 8th, 2018

People are becoming wary of chemicals, especially chemicals that get added to food and water. And in most cases, it’s a good thing to be wary of certain chemical additives; however, one such additive (considered a mineral) that should not be grouped with others is fluoride. Fluoride does get added to most community water supplies (In fact, fluoride has been added to water supplies in the United States for over seventy years). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has deemed the addition of fluoride to water supplies to be one of the ten great health achievements of the twentieth century. But fluoride is added to water supplies and certain fluoride toothpastes because it helps to prevent cavities in both children and adults. It helps the outer surfaces of the teeth (the hard, protective surface is called the enamel) be more resistant to acid attacks from the bacteria that cause tooth decay.

Fluoride is added to toothpaste and into community water supplies because it helps to rebuild weak tooth enamel—tooth enamel gets broken down and weakened for any number of reasons (It especially breaks down naturally as we age)—and the rebuilt enamel resists tooth decay.

Remember that it’s important to brush your teeth twice every day, and for two minutes. You should brush all the surfaces of your teeth, and, for adults and children over the age of six (children who are unable to spit out the toothpaste should not use an adult toothpaste) you should use a fluoride toothpaste with the ADA (American Dental Association) seal of approval on its packaging. A child who is too young to spit out toothpaste should be supervised while he or she brushes. A child who is unable to spit out toothpaste should use no more than a slight amount of toothpaste (Generally speaking, the amount of toothpaste required should be the size of a pea, and children younger than three should use toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice).

Remember also to schedule your next appointment with your dentist at Premier Smile. A regular dental checkup is an important component to quality oral health.

Happy Holidays!

December 5th, 2017

The holiday season is a hard time for teeth; if for no other reason than the perpetual snacking: parties, an office get-together, gift boxes of candies, platters of cookies and other sugary treats, champagne and/or sugary ciders (beverages like Martinelli’s sparkling cider are often overlooked as being bad for teeth). The holiday season is a lot of fun. And, no, you don’t have to entirely abstain from sugary foods over the holiday season, but you do need to be mindful, and you will need to continue your daily oral care routine of brushing at least twice—sometimes more but we’ll get to that in a moment—and flossing at least once.

Being Mindful

There are so many delicious food options during the holiday season that it can be overwhelming. Remember, your teeth need adequate time to recover from eating and drinking beverages—all except for plain water. If you are snacking on delicious food all day everyday throughout the next month or so, then your teeth, and the natural systems your mouth has to fight against cavities—i.e. saliva—won’t be given adequate time to do the job.

Have a plan. If you are going to be attending a holiday party in the middle of the day—i.e. that yearly potluck-style party at the office where everyone brings in platters of cookies and other baked goods, candies—then pack with you a toothbrush and toothpaste. Clean your teeth after such an event. Yes, your mouth can handle quite a lot, but don’t overdo it. Brushing after the midafternoon party, for approximately two minutes, you can get your mouth back into shape.

Remember to avoid chewing hard candies, always. Not only can a hard candy potentially crack a tooth, it can remain stuck in the gaps between teeth and on a tooth’s surface, doing its sugary damage for long periods before finally being dissolved by saliva.

We hope you have a happy holiday season, and we hope that through all your enjoyments you will be mindful of your eating habits and keep to a quality oral care routine.

Flossing, Quality Oral Health

March 19th, 2017

Recently it’s been reported that flossing is not considered a necessary practice for quality oral health. However, those at the ADA (American Dental Association) deem this not to be the case, and in fact are still in full support of the practice of flossing at least once daily. Flossing is an important practice, because it helps to remove the plaque buildup from the space between the teeth, the spaces too narrow for toothbrush bristles to clean adequately. If plaque is not dealt with, it can lead to gum disease such as gingivitis, or the even more devastating periodontal disease, if the gingivitis is not dealt with promptly.

Flossing Routine

Flossing is a necessary practice, and for those of you who haven’t yet added it to their daily oral care routine, here’s how it is performed. If you have a spool of floss, regardless the width of the strip—floss comes narrow or thick, flavored, unflavored, etc.—peel free from the spool about eighteen inches—make eighteen inches your minimum, if you go over slightly, it’s nothing to worry about. Wind the floss around either your pointer fingers, or your middle fingers, and then grip the strand running between your fingers with your thumbs. Angle the open strand of floss into a space between teeth—it’s easier to begin in a central location so that you don’t forget your starting location—and then gently rub the floss up and down, back and forth in the space between the teeth, cleaning from the gum line upward. Be patient, and don’t jerk the floss back and forth, and don’t jam the floss into the gum tissue. Continue this process in each space between teeth, then discard the floss. Do this once daily—and it doesn’t matter if you floss before or after you brush, just that it gets performed.

When you start a flossing routine, you may notice some initial bleeding at the gumline, maybe some redness, because the gum tissue needs to toughen up, so to speak, get used to the gentle abrasion of the floss; and, these symptoms should subside within a week or two.

If you have any questions about flossing, or just need to schedule your next appointment, call Premier Dental and make your next appointment today.

Sugar and Oral Health

December 12th, 2016

We all know that sugar can be detrimental to quality oral health. This is because bacteria, the kind that creates acids in our mouths, that breaks down our tooth enamel, loves sugar even more than we do. Did you know, however, that sugars (non-naturally occurring sugars, added sugars) can hide in a lot of different types of foods? Some processed foods might be full of processed sugars; some brands of corn dogs could have enough processed sugars in it to rival that tasty doughnut in the display case at the bakery. How do we know? The easy answer is to read the label, read the ingredients. But, here are a few other tips, when grocery shopping, so that you can make an educated decision as to what’s considered healthy and what’s not.
Often products can be marketed as healthy for reasons such as being low-calorie, or low carb, even gluten-free. But low calorie doesn’t necessarily mean low sugar. Sweeteners like corn syrup are often added to these foods, and corn syrup is a very high source of added sugar. Also juices, which are often marketed as being healthy for the body, are loaded with added sugars. Fruits and vegetables on their own have lots of naturally occurring sugars, although these types of sugars are thought to have less a negative impact than added sugars. Limit your juice intake as you would limit your sugary food intake—sparingly.

Often we give juices to children as a healthier alternative to sodas and other sugary drinks, but we may be serving up a similar sugar load, packaged differently. Obviously with soft drinks, even diet soft drinks—most of which are made with various sweeteners, some of which have been determined to be a health risk to our bodies as well as our teeth (you’ll see a warning for them on the label)—are bad for our teeth, and, if consumed at all, should be consumed in limited quantity. Consider banning sugary drinks like sodas from your daily habits, if not for your oral health, then consider that soft drinks can contribute greatly to diabetes.

It’s the Holiday season, which means everywhere you go there will be sugary sweets waiting, some plate of cookies, a gift basket full of treats. Remember to eat sweets in moderation and stick with your quality oral care routine throughout the season, even if you’re travelling. Happy Holidays!

Call us TODAY (402) 718-8737 to schedule your appointment today!

Why do wisdom teeth need to be removed?

September 22nd, 2015

Why do wisdom teeth need to be removed? - Oral Surgery Teeth Extractions Omaha NE

Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team at Premier Dental get this question a lot. Wisdom teeth are the last teeth to come in, once young people get their adult teeth. Because they are the last teeth to break through the gums, they are often called the third molars. There are four wisdom teeth: two on each side of the top and bottom of the mouth.

There is no hard-and-fast rule that says everyone must have the wisdom teeth removed. There are certain situations in which they either cause problems directly, or create a situation where there is a greater likelihood problems will arise eventually.

Impacted wisdom teeth

If Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team say you have a soft tissue impaction, it means your wisdom tooth is covered by gum tissue that is preventing it from erupting — most likely because your mouth is too small to provide the tooth with the room it needs to emerge.

The term “partial bony impaction” means that gum tissue is covering the wisdom tooth, but part of the jaw bone is also covering it, in which case there is no room in your mouth for the tooth to erupt. The opposite end of this spectrum is a complete bony impaction, where the wisdom tooth is completely covered by gum tissue and the jawbone, which prevent it from ever erupting.

The importance of removing impacted wisdom teeth

Dentists often want to remove impacted wisdom teeth because of the likelihood that they will cause problems, or because a problem already exists. One such problem is pericoronitis, an acute abscess that affects partially impacted wisdom teeth. Food, bacteria, and other mouth debris can become lodged under the gum flap that covers the wisdom tooth, which prevents it from erupting. Pericoronitis symptoms include pain, swelling, and the presence of an abscess.

Regular dental checkups will enable your dentist to keep an eye on your wisdom teeth, especially if they have some type of impaction. Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team at Premier Dental typically recommend removal of impacted wisdom teeth because of the likelihood that severe infections such as pericoronitis will develop.

If you have any questions about wisdom teeth, or if you would like to schedule an appointment with Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke, please give us a call at our convenient Omaha, NE office!

Are dental implants painful? What You Need to Know

September 8th, 2015

Are dental implants painful? What You Need to Know -  Dental Implants Omaha NE

Whether it is the result of tooth decay, gum disease, or injury, millions of people suffer tooth loss. Dental implants provide a strong replacement tooth root for fixed replacement teeth that are designed to match your natural teeth. Of course, there is one question all patients have about dental implants: are they painful?

Dental implant placement is performed under local or general anesthesia and is not considered a painful procedure. However, if the surgery is more complicated and involves bone or tissue grafts, there may be slightly more discomfort and swelling. At the same time, every patient has a different threshold for pain, so what may bother one person may not bother another. If you experience any pain from dental implants, there are several things can do to relive it.

Relieving Pain from Dental Implants

1. The initial healing phase can last up to seven to ten days. Over-the-counter painkillers such as Tylenol, Ibuprofen, and Motrin work well to alleviate any pain or discomfort you may experience. However, only take these if instructed to by Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke.

2. Once you leave our Omaha, NE office, you can reduce inflammation and any swelling to your cheek or lip by holding an ice-pack on your face over the implant area.

3. Your gum will be tender for the first few days. We often recommended that you bathe your gums with warm salt water.

4. Steer clear of crusty or hard foods for the first day or two. Ice cream, yogurt, and other soft foods are ideal as your gums will be tender.

5. Dental implants are a relatively straightforward oral procedure. Many people take time off from work to have dental implant surgery, and then return to regular activities. However, if you are feeling any pain or discomfort, there is nothing wrong with taking the day off, relaxing, and putting your feet up.

There is typically no severe post-operative pain with dental implants. When most people return for a follow-up appointment about two weeks later, they often say that getting a dental implant was one of the least painful procedures they’ve experienced.

Does getting a dental implant hurt?

August 4th, 2015

Does getting a dental implant hurt? - Dental Implant, Dental Sedation, Family Dentist Omaha NE

Getting a dental implant is a surgical procedure and everyone’s pain tolerance level is different. Therefore, what one person may perceive as pain is only a slight discomfort for another person. The general consensus about pain and dental implants is that the majority of people feel discomfort, not pain.

A dental implant is a complex procedure. Let’s take a look at what may cause discomfort:

  • Some people may find that having the IV put in is uncomfortable, especially if the healthcare worker has to try more than once. If you have a fear of needles or if you have anxiety about the procedure, we can prescribe a sedative, which you take before you arrive.
  • Of course, during the dental implant surgery, you will be asleep. Therefore, you will not feel any pain or discomfort at all.
  • When you awake from the surgery, your mouth should still be numb. In many cases, we can give you a “block” – it is basically a 24-hour pain medication, so you will not feel any pain or discomfort at all.
  • We will also provide you with a prescription for a strong pain killer, and you will most likely sleep while you are taking them. If you are still in pain, do not take more than is prescribed without calling us first. You will need someone to stay with you for 24 hours after the surgery, and they will be instructed on how to give you any prescription medication. The anesthesia tends to make people a bit loopy and forgetful the first 24 hours.
  • After the first 24 hours you may feel some discomfort. The most important thing you can do is take your pain medication regularly, whether you are taking the prescription medication or an over-the-counter pain reliever such as Tylenol or Advil.
  • You should not need pain medication for more than the first few days.

Most people do say there mouth is sore and they have to be careful what they eat, so it’s best to stick to soft foods. If you have any additional questions, please contact our Omaha, NE office and speak with Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke.

Can my body reject my dental implant?

June 23rd, 2015

Can my body reject my dental implant? - Dental Implants Omaha NE

According to the International Congress of Oral Implantologists it is rare that your body will reject your dental implants. However, this does not mean that your dental implant will not fail. A successful dental implant is one that is placed in healthy bone and is properly cared for after the surgery takes place.

There is only one major reason why a dental implant would be rejected: a titanium allergy. The majority of dental implants are made with titanium because it has proven to be the most biologically compatible of all metals. On average, less than one percent of potential dental implant recipients reported an allergy to titanium.

Dental Implant Failure

The most common cause of dental implant failure in the upper and lower jaw is bacteria. Everyone has bacteria in their mouth. If you have bacteria in your jawbone at the time of your dental implant, it can spread from implant to implant, causing dental implant failure.

If you do not take proper care of your dental implants, that could also cause them to fail. You also have to take proper care of the implant and keep your mouth clean. The development of excessive bacteria around the implant and in surrounding tissues can lead to implant failure.

Teeth grinding is another reason dental implants fail. When you grind your teeth, it can move the implants out of position. Therefore, you should wear a mouthpiece when you go to sleep if you know you grind or clench.

If you take care of your implants by practicing good oral hygiene and visit our Omaha, NE office, you should not have any problems with your new dental implants. As always, ask Drs. Beninato, Larson, Berry, and Bost about any questions or concerns you have about you dental implants.

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