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Orthodontics Omaha NE

Cold/Flu Season and Dental Health

January 7th, 2019

Illness can wreak both mental and physical havoc on the body. And while the common cold and the flu bring the most noticeable symptoms to various parts of the circulatory system, it can also have a negative impact on our dental health.

Good hygiene is absolutely important when you have a cold or the flu. Did you know that the flu virus can survive for seventy-two hours? That means that your toothbrush is contagious with the virus even after you’ve gotten over it. So, don’t share your toothbrush with anyone during the cold and flu season (Although it’s best to keep to this rule year round). It’s probably important also to throw out the toothbrush once you begin to feel better. It can be hard to get rid of a toothbrush early, but you don’t want recontamination, nor do you want to spread it to anyone else with whom you share bathroom space. But it’s not all bad with your toothbrush. While you are sick the act of brushing your teeth can leave you with a reinvigorated feeling; it improves your outlook. Remember to keep to a schedule of brushing at least twice daily and flossing once.

One common symptom of illness is dehydration and dry mouth. You may experience dry mouth because of dehydration or even as an unfortunate side effect of certain medication—antihistamines, for example, are notorious for causing dry mouth. You want to drink lots of fluids while you are sick. Dry mouth can leave the teeth susceptible to a cavity. And choose the right fluids when you’re sick. Yes, sports drinks are a good balance in the body when you’re sick, and oftentimes are used to replenish the electrolyte storage in the body, but you’ll want to drink them in moderation, and remember to brush your teeth soon after consuming them.

Hopefully you remain healthy, cold-and-flu-free, this winter season, but if you don’t then remember to take care of yourself. The winter months are also a terrific time to come in and see your dentist at Premier Smile for a checkup.

Vacation and Dental Health: Prepare for Anything…

July 10th, 2018

When you are on vacation, the number one dental tip you should always try to remember is to keep to your regular dental routine of brushing twice and flossing once. Remember, your mouth does not realize you are going on vacation, and in fact it’s while on vacation that many of us eat those undesirable goodies, drink sugary beverages, etc. So, remember to keep to a routine and keep your teeth and gums clean. In addition, here’s a few more tips to keep your mouth healthy while on vacation.

Keep to Regular Dental Visits

Regular Dental Visits are important for many reasons, but before you go on vacation it’s important to remember to go in to Premier Smile for a routine check-up. Your dentist will be able to determine problems long before they become physically apparent to you. Not only does this allow you peace of mind while on vacation, but it also provides your dentist with up-to-date information on the current state of your mouth. If you have a dental emergency while on vacation, and you know the number to Premier Smile, then your dentist can help walk you through the problem; sometimes, a dental emergency can wait until you get home for treatment, while in other cases you may need to go in for an emergency dental treatment.

Tooth Brush Tips:

The toothbrush can be one of the most confounding-to-pack items. But it doesn’t have to be. To keep it simple, pack your toothbrush in a simple plastic sandwich bag; the bag will help protect the tooth brush from dirt and grime and it can also be easily opened and stored once you get to your destination. If you forget your toothbrush, you can get away with a simpler cleaning, placing a small amount of toothpaste on the tip of your clean finger or on a damp, clean rag, and brush. And while this does work to clean the mouth the effectiveness of the cleaning is subpar to a cleaning from a bristled toothbrush, and you should try to find a replacement toothbrush soon.

Proper Nutrition And Dental Health

April 8th, 2018

We all have probably heard that consuming overly-sugary foods and beverages can lead to tooth decay, but did you also know that your mouth is likely to be the first place to indicate signs of poor nutrition? It’s true. Evidence of poor nutrition is evident, usually, within the mouth before it shows in areas of the body. Everything you eat and drink has an impact, no matter how small or how brief, on your dental health.

Nutrition depends on many things; to consider nutrition per the recommended guidelines developed by the Department of Agriculture, a person’s nutrition depends on age, gender, level of activity, and other inherent health factors. This means that calories and other dietary restrictions are based on several different factors, and that no two people are exactly alike, but everyone’s diet should have balance and moderation. For instance, unless a person has certain dietary restrictions that prevent it, people should consume lots of fruits and vegetables. Also, grains are important—of course, again, this depends on dietary restrictions—and foods such as oatmeal, whole wheat bread, and brown rice are an especially important part of our diet. Dairy should be low-fat and limited to moderation, and foods that are rich in protein such as fish and skinless meat—remember that certain meats can be hard on the body and should be consumed in moderation—but also protein-rich foods such as legumes—i.e. beans and lentils.

While a diet is an incredibly important aspect to full body health, quality dental health depends also on several other factors that include: the frequency a person eats—regular snacking is not recommended, because it’s hard to keep the teeth clean—the combinations of foods a person consumes in one sitting, and any other conditions—gastrointestinal problems and systemic diseases such as diabetes—which may alter the way our bodies process food.

Remember, our mouths are one of many of the components to full body health, and oral health is not only about just twice daily brushings one once daily flossing—although these are very, very important components.

Happy Holidays!

December 5th, 2017

The holiday season is a hard time for teeth; if for no other reason than the perpetual snacking: parties, an office get-together, gift boxes of candies, platters of cookies and other sugary treats, champagne and/or sugary ciders (beverages like Martinelli’s sparkling cider are often overlooked as being bad for teeth). The holiday season is a lot of fun. And, no, you don’t have to entirely abstain from sugary foods over the holiday season, but you do need to be mindful, and you will need to continue your daily oral care routine of brushing at least twice—sometimes more but we’ll get to that in a moment—and flossing at least once.

Being Mindful

There are so many delicious food options during the holiday season that it can be overwhelming. Remember, your teeth need adequate time to recover from eating and drinking beverages—all except for plain water. If you are snacking on delicious food all day everyday throughout the next month or so, then your teeth, and the natural systems your mouth has to fight against cavities—i.e. saliva—won’t be given adequate time to do the job.

Have a plan. If you are going to be attending a holiday party in the middle of the day—i.e. that yearly potluck-style party at the office where everyone brings in platters of cookies and other baked goods, candies—then pack with you a toothbrush and toothpaste. Clean your teeth after such an event. Yes, your mouth can handle quite a lot, but don’t overdo it. Brushing after the midafternoon party, for approximately two minutes, you can get your mouth back into shape.

Remember to avoid chewing hard candies, always. Not only can a hard candy potentially crack a tooth, it can remain stuck in the gaps between teeth and on a tooth’s surface, doing its sugary damage for long periods before finally being dissolved by saliva.

We hope you have a happy holiday season, and we hope that through all your enjoyments you will be mindful of your eating habits and keep to a quality oral care routine.

Braces And What You Need To Know

September 2nd, 2016

Braces are used to better align teeth, correcting bad bites, crooked or crowded teeth.  Braces are also helpful for those with straight teeth but with a misaligned bite.  Braces are very common, and with the advent of clear-style braces like Invisalign, braces are becoming increasingly popular and common on adults.  A person’s teeth might be crooked for any number of reasons, including genetics, childhood thumb/pacifier-sucking habits, injury, etc.  The problem associated with crooked teeth or a misaligned bite isn’t just cosmetic.  The problems could include tooth decay, gum disease—misaligned teeth can have surfaces that are difficult to clean, so plaque build-up could become prevalent on these surfaces— bad wear on the tooth’s enamel, etc.  So, even if you don’t mind the look of crooked teeth, straight teeth are critical to long-term oral health.

How Braces Work
The type of treatment and the length of treatment needed will vary according to the needs of the patient, however the straightening/aligning process will be accomplished by using either traditional braces (small brackets cemented onto the surfaces of the teeth that are connected by a wire, which a dentist will use to straighten the teeth by a balancing of precise pressures to the brackets).  Another product called Invisalign is a removable aligner which is placed over the teeth in a similar manner to a sports mouth guard, however the aligner is clear and made to look as if there is no device over the teeth.  Invisalign devices can be removed periodically from the teeth and easily cleaned, however because they the devices are so easily removed, it may not be the best option for the wary pre-teen, who may or may not wear the device at all appropriate times.

Cleaning Braces
Braces clean up with a toothbrush and toothpaste in the same manner as the surfaces of teeth, however, because of the placement of the bracket on the surface of the tooth, plaque can build up around the edges of the brackets and permanently stain the teeth if the wearer is not habitually completing quality tooth brushings twice daily.  The advice to avoid sugary foods and drinks, or to at least consume them sparingly, is quality advice for someone with or without braces.

Caring for Your Smile While Wearing Invisalign®

June 9th, 2015

Caring for Your Smile While Wearing Invisalign®, Invisalign Omaha NE

Getting your braces off is exciting. You’ve been working on your new smile for months or years, and it’s time for the trips to our Omaha, NE office to pay off. Can you imagine how bad it would be to discover that your teeth are straight, but that there’s decay?

Caring for your smile while wearing Invisalign goes beyond just waiting for your teeth to get straighter. It involves cleaning your teeth regularly and thoroughly to prevent tooth decay. That way, your smile will be more beautiful than ever when you’re done with your Invisalign treatment.

Take Your Trays Out

The first difference you may notice between Invisalign and traditional metal braces is that Invisalign aligners are invisible, but there’s another important distinction as well. Invisalign braces are removable. You can take the trays out, and you should. Remove the trays while you’re eating so you don’t get food stuck in them. Also, remove them while you’re cleaning your teeth so that you can have full access to all the nooks and crannies in your mouth.

Brush Normally

The guidelines for brushing your teeth with Invisalign don’t change compared to braces. Brush your teeth at least twice a day using a soft toothbrush and a fluoride toothpaste, being sure to get all surfaces of your teeth. If possible, brush after each meal.

If you can’t, be sure to drink some water and swish it around in your mouth when you’re done eating to get rid of the extra food on your teeth. Leaving carbohydrates, such as sugar and starch, on your teeth opens the door to tooth decay.

Floss and Wash

Flossing your teeth gets out the bits and pieces stuck between them. It’s a time-consuming task when you need to navigate the wires of traditional metal braces, but thanks to Invisalign’s removable design, flossing is no problem. Rinsing your mouth with a fluoride antibacterial mouthwash also helps clean your teeth because it gets into all of the spaces. Floss and rinse one or two times daily.

Cleaning Your Trays

Cleaning your Invisalign trays keeps them from getting riddled with bacteria, and it helps keep your teeth free from excess food. You can use the Invisalign cleaning system, which involves placing the trays in a tub with cleaning crystals. The plastic trays are clean after 15 minutes. You can also ask Drs. Beninato, Larson, Berry, and Bost for other ways to clean your trays.

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