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Pediatric Dental Care Omaha NE

Links Between Diabetes and Dental Health

December 9th, 2018

Diabetes is a difficult disease for the entire body; it takes a toll on everything, including dental health. Diabetes, like other types of systemic disease, can increase the risk of dental disease. Practicing quality dental health is a necessary component to both quality oral health as well as disease management. Diabetes can be responsible for tooth loss—according to the American Dental Association, diabetes can be responsible for total tooth loss—but when quality dental health is put at a premium, including routine cleaning both at home and at the dentist’s office at Premier Smile, the risk of total tooth loss and other dental disease is lessened.

First Signs of Gum Disease?

Bleeding gums is a likely symptom of disease. Gums that bleed when you brush or floss could be a sign of gum disease. Thankfully, however, it doesn’t mean that the symptoms cannot be reversed. In its earlies stages, gum disease is treatable with quality oral care—twice daily quality brushings, and flossing once—and through dietary restriction. Limiting sugar in a diet, etc. When a person has diabetes, fluctuating blood sugars can increase the likelihood of gum disease.

Dry Mouth and Infection

Diabetes can cause symptoms of dry mouth. And saliva is responsible for clearing away sugar and other food debris from the teeth. Infection is a common condition among people with diabetes because diabetes decreases the immune system. A condition called thrush, which is a type of yeast infection within the mouth, a white, patchy covering. The yeast in the mouth feed on the sugars, and, thriving, can unfortunately leave a person suffering the condition with a persistent bad taste. Infections may also be as simple as a common mouth sore. When a person has a compromised immune system his or her body has a difficult time healing cuts and sores, etc. And a sore in the mouth, however simple, may not heal for a long time.

If you have any questions about the complications of diabetes and dental health, or if you are ready to schedule your next appointment with your dentist at Premier Smile, then call today.

Cavities and Medication

August 4th, 2018

Did you know that it’s possible to get cavities later in life? It’s true. Too often we consider youth to be the only time during which we are prone to cavities. But, unfortunately, it’s also possible to get cavities later in life, especially after we’ve aged past middle age, and the number one cause is often dry mouth. There are other reasons, too—aging is a process that affects all aspects of our bodies. (Too often we consider the teeth to be different than the rest of the body).

Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging, and it is possible to have the condition treated. But it is also important that you check the side effects of your medications, and, in the event that there’s a possibility to adjust medications to alleviate dry mouth as a symptom, you should consult your primary physician. But know that it is a possible side-effect for more than 500 different medications; these medications are varied, but include medications for asthma, high cholesterol, pain medications, anxiety and depression medications, high blood pressure, and even common antihistamines. Your dentist at Premier Smile will be able to recommend several different methods to help alleviate the symptoms of dry mouth.

Remember when you experience the symptoms of dry mouth to keep hydrated. You should carry a water bottle with you when you go out, and drink water even at the times when you’re not thirsty. You can also use sugar-free gum—make sure it’s sugarless and without hard granulated crystals—to keep your mouth from going completely dry. And avoid drinks such as coffee and alcohol.

Remember that’s it’s very important to keep your teeth clean even when you’re older. You should brush your teeth twice daily—for at least two minutes—and floss at least once. And it’s imperative that you remember to visit your dentist, regularly, so that your dentist at Premier Smile can both clean your teeth and determine any possible changes in the mouth long before those changes become difficult problems.

Teething: When to Expect a Baby’s First Tooth

June 9th, 2018

Probably you don’t need to know the signs and symptoms of a teething baby. The most obvious sign that a child’s first tooth is coming into his or her mouth are irritability and restlessness. The baby may have difficulty sleeping at night, and he or she may seem distracted and confused during the day. It’s easy to see why this entirely natural process is irritating and possibly even painful: a baby is born with all twenty of his or her baby teeth already below the gum line, and when those teeth sprout they literally push up through the gum tissue.

When to Expect a Baby’s First Tooth

A baby will typically begin to sprout his or her teeth between the ages of 6 and 12 months; he or she could begin sooner or even later than that, but this is a good guideline. Once the baby has begun the teething process he or she will continue to sprout all twenty teeth by the time he or she is around three years old.

Normal Baby Teething Symptoms

A baby who is teething will be naturally fussy. They will have trouble sleeping occasionally, and the loss in sleep could escalate his or her fussiness during the day. It is also normal for a baby to have a decreased appetite while teething.

Not Normal Symptoms

A fever is not a common symptom of teething. A baby’s fever could be caused by any number of reasons and should not be ignored. Also, diarrhea and a rash are not direct signs of teething alone, and if the condition persists you should contact your baby’s pediatrician.

Alleviate Symptoms of Teething

Oftentimes a baby’s symptoms can be alleviated or at the very least lessened in intensity by applying a cool cloth to the gum tissue; place your finger inside the cloth and gently massage the baby’s gums. A clean teething ring can also bring some comfort to a teething baby.

When a baby develops teeth it’s time for his or her first visit to the dentist. Oftentimes, bringing a child to the dentist early in his or her life will lessen the potential anxieties of going as they get older.  Call Premiere Dental today!

Oral Care For Your Baby

March 5th, 2018

A baby needs his or her gums and initial teeth cleaned as frequently as his or her parents. It’s not true that because a baby is going to receive a new set of adult teeth that the health of baby teeth can simply be ignored. Plaque begins to form on a baby’s gum line as soon as he or she takes that first bit of milk or formula into his or her mouth. To clean a baby’s gums, even before his or her baby teeth have sprouted, use a soft, damp cloth and gently massage the baby’s gum line. You can begin to do this just a few days after birth, and continue with it until a child has sprouted all his or her baby teeth.

When a child gets his or her first tooth then it’s time to brush. Use a tiny amount of toothpaste—a toothpaste that’s meant for small children (if you have any questions as to the types of child toothpastes then talk to your child’s dentist at Premier Smile)—the amount of toothpaste used should be in an amount that’s comparable to a grain of rice—small. Massage the child’s tooth or teeth with a child-sized toothbrush twice a day. Keep a tooth brushing routine and the child will begin to adopt the habit as they grow.

As the child gets older, and he or she has a mouth full of teeth, you can begin to up the dosage of toothpaste—in an amount no larger than a pea—and he or she can help you brush his or her teeth. As the child gets older and more autonomous you can have the child brush his or her own teeth, but until the child is autonomous enough to handle the entire process, alone, you should still be present to supervise.

Also remember that a child’s first dental visit should happen early. Plan on bringing your child into Premier Smile so that he or she may not only have their teeth cleaned and examined, but he or she will also experience the dentist’s office; hopefully, in giving them a proper introduction to the dentist they will be less likely to develop a fear or anxiety.

February is Childrens Dental Health Month: What to Know!

January 29th, 2018

As an adult, your oral care routine tends to remain fairly static for a large part of your life. Brush and floss. Rinse, perhaps, if you’re fond of it. And, unless you need prosthetics, that’s about all you’ll ever do. But, what about your kids? Toddlers? Adolescents? What sort of routine should they follow? Is it the same as yours? And, should it change from time to time? Since it’s February, and Children’s Dental Health month is upon us, let’s take a quick dive into “what’s-what” from toddlers to teens when it comes to oral care.

Infants/Toddlers:
Use a warm washcloth or gauze pad to wipe your child’s gums after feedings. While most infants don’t begin sprouting teeth until around month six, you’ll still want to keep their gums free of oral bacteria that can develop from normal feeding.
Before your child’s first birthday, visit the dentist for an initial check-up
Around month six, and with the arrival of a child’s first teeth, ask your dentist if it’s the right time to start brushing. For tips on how to make this first step in oral care fun, check out our article on toddler tooth-brushing training tips!
Pre-schoolers:
By this age, your children will be brushing like a mad person. Be sure they learn not to brush too hard. Teach by example, and they’ll keep this good habit their entire lives.
Once a child starts to have teeth that touch, you can introduce flossing. This is extremely variable, and not really related to age, so work with your dentist on this one.
Begin experimenting with disclosing tablets so your child can see how effective their brushing is as they learn to wield a brush on their own.
Grade-schoolers:
Brushing and flossing should be the norm by this time in a child’s life. Experiment with a variety of floss options to find one that works for your child. Rotate between floss picks as well, to what works for your kids.
Once a child learns to spit (this time varies widely) an alcohol mouth rinse could be used if warranted. Ask your dentist, but at this age, there isn’t often a need.
Teens:
Everything changes when kids become teenagers. Orthodontic appliances of all sorts come into play, and oral care can start to seem like a burden. Some kids also start consuming high carbohydrate and acidic beverages, so brushing and flossing are obviously required, and mouthwashes can be used particularly for kids with braces.
Proper prosthetic care is important to keep one’s mouth smelling and feeling fresh, so, yes … brushing the retainer becomes part of the routine.
Be sure your kids are getting up-to-date lessons on brushing technique from their dentist and/or hygienist.
So, as you can see, setting an oral care routine for your little ones is mostly about prepping them for brushing, the middle years are about getting them into the habit of doing things on their own, and (to a degree) the teenage years are, at least a little bit a fallback to having to be a bit of a watchdog on your kids behalf. They’ll gladly, and sometimes vehemently disagree with you as to how to take care of their teeth … your fun is in learning how to encourage, support and provide foresight without being too much of a parent while doing it! And, of course we are always here to lend help and support!

Why Premier Dental Hosts 4th Annual Candy Buy Back...

November 2nd, 2017

Holidays and Sugar
Halloween has come and gone, yet the candy lingers. We know the amount of sugar presented to kids at this holiday and most is absurd, and we know that excess sugar leads to tooth decay and a whole host of other issues (you can read about : Ten Ways Sugar is Hurting Your Kids ). Unfortunately, many of our American traditions involve copious amounts of sugar!
  • Birthdays = Cake
  • Easter = Chocolate Eggs & Jelly Beans
  • Christmas = Cookies & Candies
  • Independence Day = BBQ (full of sugar!) & Ice Cream
  • Thanksgiving = Pumpkin Pie
  • And of course, Halloween = Candy
Learning Moderation: Spacing out the candy stash for a specific amount of time can help parents keep within the 3-6 teaspoons of sugar a day recommended by the American Heart Association*. The typical U.S. child eats around 20 or more teaspoons a day, so getting your kids within the recommended amounts most likely means you will have to take sugar out of the rest of your kids meals and snacks. Think: no juice, no soda, no sugar snacks, no honey, no syrup those days. This might be hard, but it will teach not only moderation, but also trade-offs, which are a big part of life.
Giving/Sharing: Keeping only the candy your children really love, and giving the rest away, will reward them twofold: First, the brain enjoys things more when it is not overwhelmed by too many choices and when the so-so options are weeded out. (We actually get less enjoyment when our candy stashes are peppered with mediocre candies.) Give away any candy that is not in your kids' top 10 sweets, and they will be even happier with what is left. Second, giving candy away will also teach charity and sharing.
Premier Dental is hosting their 4th annual Halloween Candy Buy Back on November 6th, 2017. Kids are encouraged to bring in their candy and receive cash and register for prizes. The candy is donated to the U.S. service men and women! It's a definite win-win.  Premier Dental has also partnered with two local schools, Rohwer Elementary and Sandoz Elementary to collect candy and donate the money to the school. The kids get a prize for donating, the school earns money and the candy is out of the hands/mouths of kids.

Halloween

October 5th, 2017

Halloween. It’s that time of year again! Now, obviously, your dentist is not going to recommend you binge out on candy. No person’s teeth can handle an overabundance of sugars. You might be wondering, however, why is sugary candy so, so bad for your teeth? The answer involves bacteria. Bacteria love the abundance of sugars in candy, and while they devour the sugars in your mouth they produce an acid that wears at tooth enamel and creates cavities.

Chocolate

Chocolate is one of the best candies for teeth, because the excess debris that gets left behind is more easily washed away naturally by saliva. The better the chocolate than the lower the artificial sugar content—at least, that’s usually true (dark chocolate has considerably less sugar than milk chocolate).

Sticky Candies and Hard Candies

No, no, sticky candies. Sticky candies make it difficult for the mouth to wash away the sugar. They stick to the surfaces of the teeth and encapsulate the tooth like a sugary cap. Not good.

Sticky candies are essentially setting up bacteria colonies. When chewed, hard Candies can easily chip or crack a tooth.

Halloween Treats

There are many Halloween-time extras that are delicious; delicious, but bad for your teeth. Caramel apples are a wonderful tasting Halloween treat, however the caramel that surrounds the apple is very bad for your teeth. Caramel may be the worst sticky treat you can chew. Caramel is terrible for your teeth. If you do partake in a caramel apple, make sure that you both brush and floss your teeth soon after. Popcorn balls are another seasonal favorite. Popcorn balls are usually held together by some type of sticky, sugary substance—somewhat comparable to caramel. Popcorn balls are also usually hard and can damage teeth in a way similar to hard candy. Also, the corn kernels may get stuck between teeth or in the spaces between a tooth and the gum line; if you do eat a popcorn ball, then make sure you brush and floss.

Stay safe this Halloween, and keep to your good oral health practices.  If you need to make your next appointment, make sure to call Premier Smile today.

Why We Floss

September 10th, 2017

We all know that flossing is important. But why? Why, daily, should we have to slip that strand of floss between our teeth, clean out the space down to the gum line? Don’t a toothbrush’s bristles get far enough into those narrow spaces? The number one reason to floss is to help to rid the surfaces of the teeth from harmful bacteria that can develop plaque, which, if allowed to thrive, will then harden into a substance called tartar. Tartar cannot be removed by twice-daily brushing and flossing. Bacteria that are allowed to thrive can cause chronic conditions such as gingivitis or the more severe periodontal disease. Bacteria allowed to thrive can be responsible for halitosis (bad breath).

How to Floss

Flossing is relatively simple, and if you are someone who doesn’t have a lot of experience (it’s estimated that over thirty percent of adults who are over the age of thirty don’t floss—at all) with a week’s worth of practicing you will have mastered the skill. First, start out with a strand of floss about 12-18 inches in length. (It doesn’t matter which type of floss you use; floss comes in numerous sizes, colors, and flavors—they all work!). Wrap the ends of the floss around your index fingers and work it into the space between two teeth. Slide the floss between the teeth keeping your hands at opposing angles that make the floss bend around the tooth—it should look like the letter C. It’s easiest to begin at a tooth at the edge of the mouth, or a tooth in the very center, so that you will remember which teeth you have already cleaned.

If you have issues with dexterity, there are appliances which can be used with just one hand. One such product is a soft plaque remover, which resembles something like a soft toothpick, and the other appliance is a flossing aid, which traps the ends of the floss between two prongs, and the flossing aid can be maneuvered over the spaces between the teeth, using just one hand.  To schedule your next dental checkup, call Premier Smile today.

Raising Children's Oral Health Awareness in February!

February 17th, 2017

Premier Dental may be coming to a school near you! We have planned several school visits to promote Children's Dental Health Month and Oral Health Awareness! February has been named National Children's Health Month by the American Dental Association (ADA) in an effort to promote better dental health for children all over the country.

"What children eat and when they eat it may affect not only their general health, but also their oral health," said Dr. Piper Larson of Premier Dental. "Americans are consuming more and more sugary food and drinks than ever before. Energy drinks and junk foods have gradually replaced nutritious beverages and foods for many. February is a great opportunity for us to provide community support in the battle against sugar."

According to the NCCIH, about 30% of teenagers consume energy drinks on a regular basis. Many energy drinks contain as much as 25-50 g of simple sugars. There is also the safety factor that is question with these drinks.  Large amounts of caffeine and other additives pose other health risks as well.

Here at Premier Dental we like to refer parents and kids to the American Dental Association Guidelines to help reduce the risk of tooth decay:

  • Limit snacking between meals to healthy, low sugar options.
  • If you are going to consume sugary drinks or foods do so with meals when saliva production is high and this can help neutralize acid production.
  • Stick to sugarless gum after eating to increase saliva flow and assist in removing food particles from the mouth.
  • Think about what your child is drinking and increase their intake of water.
  • Stick to regularly scheduled dental appointments.

At Premier Dental and Premier Pediatric Dentistry we encourage all patients, regardless of age, to follow these guidelines along with daily brushing and flossing.

Braces And What You Need To Know

September 2nd, 2016

Braces are used to better align teeth, correcting bad bites, crooked or crowded teeth.  Braces are also helpful for those with straight teeth but with a misaligned bite.  Braces are very common, and with the advent of clear-style braces like Invisalign, braces are becoming increasingly popular and common on adults.  A person’s teeth might be crooked for any number of reasons, including genetics, childhood thumb/pacifier-sucking habits, injury, etc.  The problem associated with crooked teeth or a misaligned bite isn’t just cosmetic.  The problems could include tooth decay, gum disease—misaligned teeth can have surfaces that are difficult to clean, so plaque build-up could become prevalent on these surfaces— bad wear on the tooth’s enamel, etc.  So, even if you don’t mind the look of crooked teeth, straight teeth are critical to long-term oral health.

How Braces Work
The type of treatment and the length of treatment needed will vary according to the needs of the patient, however the straightening/aligning process will be accomplished by using either traditional braces (small brackets cemented onto the surfaces of the teeth that are connected by a wire, which a dentist will use to straighten the teeth by a balancing of precise pressures to the brackets).  Another product called Invisalign is a removable aligner which is placed over the teeth in a similar manner to a sports mouth guard, however the aligner is clear and made to look as if there is no device over the teeth.  Invisalign devices can be removed periodically from the teeth and easily cleaned, however because they the devices are so easily removed, it may not be the best option for the wary pre-teen, who may or may not wear the device at all appropriate times.

Cleaning Braces
Braces clean up with a toothbrush and toothpaste in the same manner as the surfaces of teeth, however, because of the placement of the bracket on the surface of the tooth, plaque can build up around the edges of the brackets and permanently stain the teeth if the wearer is not habitually completing quality tooth brushings twice daily.  The advice to avoid sugary foods and drinks, or to at least consume them sparingly, is quality advice for someone with or without braces.

The Benefits of Fluoride

August 4th, 2016

The Benefits of Fluoride, Family Dentist Omaha

Why is it that so often when we speak of healthy teeth we also mention fluoride?  It’s because fluoride fights cavities naturally, being a natural mineral found in lakes, oceans, rivers, etc.  Because of it’s beneficial properties, in most places its also added to the drinking water.

Fluoride protects the teeth by making the outer surface of a tooth (this surface is called the enamel) more resistant to the acids in our foods and beverages, which reduces the chance of chronic oral problems such as tooth decay.  Our tooth enamel breaks down with age, with the foods we eat, with sugary beverages, etc.  Fluoride then helps rebuild a weakened enamel to the threat of tooth decay.

While fluoride is found in most water supplies in the United States—about seventy-five percent—it’s also found in most toothpastes.  A quality fluoride toothpaste is an essential to the battle against tooth decay.  Dentists recommend a fluoride toothpaste, because when fluoride is applied to the surfaces of the teeth there is a twenty-five percent greater chance at not contracting cavities—this, of course, is variable due to other factors such as diet, etc.

Make sure to brush your teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste, and floss at least once everyday.  Children of any age may use a toothpaste with fluoride, however there are amount restrictions with the age and ability of the child.  For children who cannot spit out the toothpaste, a very small amount of toothpaste, no more than the size of a grain of rice should be used.

When a child is able to spit out the toothpaste reliably, the amount of toothpaste can be upped to an amount similar to the size of a pea.  There are also mouthwashes that contain fluoride, however a child under the age of six may be more likely to swallow the mouthwash than to swish it about his or her mouth, so mouthwashes should only be used by adults and older children, as mouthwashes can contain other substances which are not healthy if ingested completely.

Regular check ups with your dentist—recommended twice yearly—and a consistent schedule of oral hygiene should keep your mouth healthy and free of gum disease.

Please contact Premier Dental for all of your dental needs today!

Dental Care For Children

December 6th, 2015

Dental Care For Children Omaha NE

Did you know that it is important to start cleaning a child’s teeth as early as infancy?  Bacteria, brought about by the sugars in the milk, can build up in a child’s mouth before teeth have even begun to sprout from the child’s gums, so it is important at this young age to clean the gums with a damp rag regularly.  As soon as a child’s teeth begin to appear they can begin to decay.  Getting a child in the habit of quality oral care is also important at this stage; good habits can begin early and be lasting for the child.

A child should sprout his or her first tooth between the ages of six and eight months‑some children, however, wont get their first teeth for twelve months or more.  When a child has his or her first tooth it is important to begin to clean the tooth with a child’s size toothbrush.  Use a small amount of toothpaste that contains fluoride—think pea-sized amount—on the toothbrush and brush the tooth or teeth both back and forth (sawing motion) along the tops of the teeth and in circular motions over the fronts of the teeth.  At this age it is still important to brush a child’s teeth twice everyday, morning and night.

After the age of three, and the child has begun to spit out their toothpaste into the sink, it is a good idea to teach them to brush his or her own teeth.  Make sure that the child does not swallow the toothpaste and it is best to continue to supervise his or her progress.

Another important aspect of dental care for children is to have visited the dentist by their first birthday.  Not only is it important to have a child’s teeth cleaned and checked, the first dental visit begins a relationship in the child’s mind with the dentist.  The world is full of adults that are fearful of the dentist, and if a child is exposed to the dentist early, and he or she has a positive experience, he or she will be on a path to good oral care for a lifetime.

Did you know that it is important to start cleaning a child’s teeth as early as infancy?  Bacteria, brought about by the sugars in the milk, can build up in a child’s mouth before teeth have even begun to sprout from the child’s gums, so it is important at this young age to clean the gums with a damp rag regularly.  As soon as a child’s teeth begin to appear they can begin to decay.  Getting a child in the habit of quality oral care is also important at this stage; good habits can begin early and be lasting for the child.

A child should sprout his or her first tooth between the ages of six and eight months‑some children, however, wont get their first teeth for twelve months or more.  When a child has his or her first tooth it is important to begin to clean the tooth with a child’s size toothbrush.  Use a small amount of toothpaste that contains fluoride—think pea-sized amount—on the toothbrush and brush the tooth or teeth both back and forth (sawing motion) along the tops of the teeth and in circular motions over the fronts of the teeth.  At this age it is still important to brush a child’s teeth twice everyday, morning and night.

After the age of three, and the child has begun to spit out their toothpaste into the sink, it is a good idea to teach them to brush his or her own teeth.  Make sure that the child does not swallow the toothpaste and it is best to continue to supervise his or her progress.

Another important aspect of dental care for children is to have visited the dentist by their first birthday.  Not only is it important to have a child’s teeth cleaned and checked, the first dental visit begins a relationship in the child’s mind with the dentist.  The world is full of adults that are fearful of the dentist, and if a child is exposed to the dentist early, and he or she has a positive experience, he or she will be on a path to good oral care for a lifetime.

And if you have a medical flex savings account, now is the time to use it or you lose it.

What's on your fall reading list?

October 6th, 2015

What's on your fall reading list? - Pediatric Dental Care Omaha NE

How better to spend the fall months than inside by the fireplace with a warm cup of cider and a book in hand? Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team at Premier Dental encourage you to warm up your mind this fall season with a few great books. Sure it may be easy to put off reading when balancing a hectic schedule, but reading is vital to brain development. Besides, reading is always a blast!

This week, we thought we’d ask what you or your child are reading this fall. Do you have any suggestions for must-read books this year? Out of ideas for great fall reads? Ask us for suggestions, and we would be happy to provide a few. You may also ask a local librarian here in Omaha, NE for some ideas.

Happy reading! Be sure to share with us your fall picks or your all-time favorites below or on our Facebook page!

Is dairy crucial to my child's oral health?

September 29th, 2015

Is dairy crucial to my child's oral health? - Pediatric Dentist Omaha NE

Healthy eating, combined with regular physical activity, plays a vital role in your child’s health and well-being. Dairy foods are naturally nutritious, packed with ten essential nutrients that help your child feel good for life. But did you know that dairy is also great for your child’s dental health? Our team at Premier Dental will tell you that, in addition to providing large amounts of much-needed calcium, dairy products also help fight cavities! Dairy products have a specific role to play in dental health as they contain a unique combination of special anti-decay nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, and the protein, casein. Cheese is especially useful, as eating a small piece of cheese after consuming sugary foods or drinks can help protect teeth and reduce the risk of tooth decay.

If you’d like to know more about the importance of dairy products in your child’s diet, or about any aspect of your child’s dental health, feel free to ask Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke at your next appointment!

Fewer Adults are Visiting the Dentist

September 15th, 2015

Fewer Adults are Visiting the Dentist - Family Dentist Omaha NE

Our team at Premier Dental recently learned that in the decade between 2000 and 2010, the amount of adults who regularly visited their dentist declined, according to research released by the American Dental Association's Health Policy Resources Center (HPRC). In fact, the HPRC found that the percentage of adults who had regular checkups every six months declined from 41 percent in 2003 to 37 percent in 2010. The largest decline in dental care occurred in the 35- to 49-year-old age group. That’s down from 43 percent in 2003 to just 38 percent in 2010.

There is some good news, however. While adult visits may have decreased, children's visits were on the rise, particularly among low-income families. More low-income children are visiting the dentist now than they were ten years ago. And the HPRC notes that between 2000 and 2010, dental visits among low-income children increased in 47 states.

Have you ever wondered why the American Dental Association and Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke recommend that you come in for a dental checkup and cleaning every six months? While daily oral hygiene habits are essential to good oral health, professional dental cleanings at Premier Dental ensure your and your child’s teeth are treated to a deeper level of cleaning. In addition to a thorough cleaning and teeth polishing, regular visits at our Omaha, NE office help us detect and prevent the onset of tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. During your visit, we’ll check the health of your mouth, teeth, gums, cheeks, and tongue for symptoms of any oral disease. We will also check old fillings and restorations, as these can wear away over time from constant chewing, clenching, or grinding at night.

If you are predisposed to oral diseases due to age, pregnancy, tobacco use, or medical conditions such as diabetes or dry mouth, Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke may recommend you visit our office more often than every six months.

If you are overdue for your next checkup and cleaning, please give us a call to schedule an appointment!

Proper Brushing Techniques

August 11th, 2015

Proper Brushing Techniques - Teeth Care, Family Dentist Omaha NE

Brushing your teeth properly removes the food particles and bacteria that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. However, you do not want to scrub your teeth or gums heavily. A heavy hand can lead to tooth and gum erosion, as Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our staff see all too often.

You should also use a soft bristle toothbrush to avoid damaging the surface of your teeth. Make sure the head of the brush fits in your mouth, because if it is too large you will not be able to reach all tooth surfaces. Follow these steps to ensure you are brushing properly.

  1. Use a small amount of toothpaste on your brush. The recommendation is a pea-sized amount or thin strip on the bristles.
  2. Hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the surface of your teeth, angling towards your gums. Use a circular motion on all exterior tooth surfaces, and avoid back-and-forth “scrub” brushing.
  3. Once you have cleaned the outer surfaces, hold the brush vertically and clean the inner teeth surfaces — the side of your teeth that face your tongue. Do not forget the inner surfaces of your front teeth.
  4. Finally, finish by cleaning all the chewing surfaces of your teeth. You need to maintain a gentle touch, but make sure you get into the full depth of your molars. The entire process should take about two minutes.

Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our staff recommend changing your toothbrush every three to four months for best results. Do not forget to clean your tongue, which helps remove excess bacteria from your mouth. Special brushes are available just for cleaning your tongue, and they are easy to use.

Proper care of your teeth also requires flossing on a regular basis. Flossing can be performed before or after you brush. Following up with a quality mouthwash will provide you with even more protection. Do not be afraid to ask the Premier Dental team for tips on proper brushing and flossing.

Welcome, Dr. Ebke!

July 29th, 2015

Welcome, Dr. Ebke! - Family Dentist Omaha NE

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Stephanie Ebke to the Premier Dental team!

Dr. Ebke grew up in the rural town of Daykin, Nebraska and has longtime family ties to the field of dentistry. As a teen, she admired the work her uncles did; one as a dentist, the other as an oral surgeon. After graduating from Fairbury High School, she received her Bachelor of Science in Nutrition from the University of Nebraska- Lincoln. She went on to attend the University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Dentistry, where she received her Doctor of Dental Surgery. Dr. Ebke states, "I am excited to be a life-long learner, and I believe continuing education is important, in order for doctors to remain up-to-date in an ever-evolving field. It allows us to provide patients with the best treatment options available."

During Stephanie’s downtime, she enjoys biking, running, snow skiing, reading, traveling, and of course, cheering on the Huskers! Spending time with friends and family is a top priority as well. When she gets home, she looks forward to being greeted by Josie, her Shiba Inu.

Dr. Ebke is passionate about dentistry and using the knowledge and skills gained through education to help her patients. She loves hearing everyone’s unique story and building lasting relationships. Whether that means achieving a brighter smile, relieving pain, or maintaining an optimal level of oral health, she looks forward to giving her absolute best to her patients. For her, the ultimate reward is helping her patients achieve their oral health goals. So if you see Dr. Ebke during your next visit to Premier Dental, please extend her a warm welcome.

What's the connection between gum disease and diabetes?

July 28th, 2015

What's the connection between gum disease and diabetes? - Family Dentist Omaha NE

People who have diabetes are usually familiar with many of the other health risks they face, including damage to the nerves, eyes, heart, and kidneys. But did you know that if you have diabetes you also have a much greater chance of developing gum disease? It's true, and like other diseases related to diabetes, the risk potential severity of gum disease is directly related to how well blood sugar is controlled.

The Causes

In diabetics, there are two primary mechanisms that increase the risk of developing gum disease, also called periodontal disease:

  • Bacterial growth: Bacteria love sugar including the glucose found in blood and bodily fluids. Elevated levels of sugar in saliva can provide a very hospitable environment for bacterial growth. The risk may be elevated if your gums bleed.
  • Circulatory changes: In diabetes, the blood vessels become thick, making it more difficult for blood to carry oxygen to the gums and to carry away harmful waste products. This decrease in circulation can weaken the mouth's natural resistance to decay. If you smoke, circulation can become even more compromised, significantly increasing your risk of periodontal disease.

Preventing Gum Disease

If you're diabetic, the number-one key to preventing gum disease is to make sure you do all you can to keep your blood sugar under control. In fact, studies show diabetics who have excellent control of their blood sugar levels have no more risk for gum disease than those who don't have diabetes. Here are some other tips to keep your gums healthy:

  • Floss your teeth gently, curving the floss so it can gently reach just below your gum line to remove plaque and food particles. Rinse your mouth when you're done flossing.
  • Use a soft-bristle brush to brush teeth twice daily, using small circular motions. Avoid pressing too hard on tooth surfaces.
  • Brush your tongue gently to remove germs that can hide there.
  • Use an anti-bacterial mouthwash to kill germs that are hard to reach.
  • Keep track of how well your blood sugar is controlled and let Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke know at each visit.
  • Be aware that having diabetes may mean it takes you longer to heal after undergoing oral surgery.

Most importantly, be sure to visit our Omaha, NE office for regular checkups and tell Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke about your diabetes so you can be sure to get the care you need. Follow these steps, and you can enjoy healthy teeth and gums for years to come.

Premier Dental Husker Ticket Giveaway!

June 19th, 2015

Have you heard the news? Dr. Beninato and our team here at Premier Dental are giving away a pair of Husker tickets to one lucky winner! And not just any tickets - they're on the 50 yard line for the October 10th game vs. Wisconsin!

There are three different ways you can enter for a chance to win:

1) Refer a friend or family member to Premier Dental
2) Leave us a review on Google+, Yelp, or Angie's List
3) Submit an in-office video testimonial

We'll be accepting entries through August 31, 2015. If you have any questions, just ask any Premier Dental Associate!

Good luck to all who enter!

Premier Dental Husker Ticket Giveaway! - Contest Omaha NE

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