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Premier Dental Community

Cold/Flu Season and Dental Health

January 7th, 2019

Illness can wreak both mental and physical havoc on the body. And while the common cold and the flu bring the most noticeable symptoms to various parts of the circulatory system, it can also have a negative impact on our dental health.

Good hygiene is absolutely important when you have a cold or the flu. Did you know that the flu virus can survive for seventy-two hours? That means that your toothbrush is contagious with the virus even after you’ve gotten over it. So, don’t share your toothbrush with anyone during the cold and flu season (Although it’s best to keep to this rule year round). It’s probably important also to throw out the toothbrush once you begin to feel better. It can be hard to get rid of a toothbrush early, but you don’t want recontamination, nor do you want to spread it to anyone else with whom you share bathroom space. But it’s not all bad with your toothbrush. While you are sick the act of brushing your teeth can leave you with a reinvigorated feeling; it improves your outlook. Remember to keep to a schedule of brushing at least twice daily and flossing once.

One common symptom of illness is dehydration and dry mouth. You may experience dry mouth because of dehydration or even as an unfortunate side effect of certain medication—antihistamines, for example, are notorious for causing dry mouth. You want to drink lots of fluids while you are sick. Dry mouth can leave the teeth susceptible to a cavity. And choose the right fluids when you’re sick. Yes, sports drinks are a good balance in the body when you’re sick, and oftentimes are used to replenish the electrolyte storage in the body, but you’ll want to drink them in moderation, and remember to brush your teeth soon after consuming them.

Hopefully you remain healthy, cold-and-flu-free, this winter season, but if you don’t then remember to take care of yourself. The winter months are also a terrific time to come in and see your dentist at Premier Smile for a checkup.

Holiday Candy Season… Survival Guide

November 8th, 2018

Halloween has come and gone, but that doesn’t mean that it’s the end of the candy season. There are plenty of opportunities to imbibe sweets—both of the candy and pastry/cookie variety—throughout the next few months. And while those sweets are delicious and fun, there are many reasons to either consume in moderation or, in some cases, avoid some sweets entirely. Here’s why…

Sugar is an enemy to teeth, but it’s not the sugar, it’s the bacteria which feed on the sugar. The bacteria in your mouth love sugar, probably even more than you do, and as bacteria consume sugar they produce a weak acid that harms teeth. That acid is the cause of cavities.

If You’re Gonna Eat Candy Then Eat…

Chocolate! In moderation chocolate is one of the better types of candy for your teeth (there is absolutely NO candy that is actually good for your teeth). The reason? Because chocolate washes from the teeth. Some types of candies form a film or remain sticky, but chocolate can be washed away by saliva and water. But that isn’t to say that there is no damage done: the bacteria are still provided sugar and the teeth should be cleaned. And if you’re going to eat chocolate, then know that most brands of non-milk chocolate are lower in overall sugar than milk chocolate.

Sticky and Gummy (Candy, Carmel Apples, and the Like).

Try to stay away from sweet treats that are sticky or gummy. These types of sweets are more difficult to remove–some hardier-types can hide between the teeth even after a vigorous brushing (for instance, if you are going to consume popcorn balls you should floss immediately because some of the kernels can become tightly wedged between the teeth)—and the long length of time it takes to dissolve or remove the sugar from the mouth gives the bacteria more time to consume the sugars and produce harmful acids.

Have a wonderful start to the holiday season, and enjoy the sweet treats, but remember to enjoy them in moderation, and to clean your teeth whenever possible.

Dental Emergencies While on Vacation. Plus, Travel Tips.

October 12th, 2018

Usually our dental health is not our first thought when we prepare for vacation. But the truth is that a dental emergency can happen at any time, and it would be entirely unfortunate to have to undergo a sore tooth or other mouth issue that could arise while you are on a beach somewhere, or at the top of a mountain. You could have to cancel the rest of your vacation if the situation was dire enough. That’s one reason why it’s important to have regular checkups; a good time to have checkup is right before you go on vacation. Your dentist at Premier Smile should notice a potential problem before one occurs; even if a patient has a mouth disease and that disease has not yet evolved to be symptomatic. One tip to remember is to keep your Premier Smile dentist’s phone number in the contacts on your phone so that you can call in the case of emergency.

Another travel tip is to remember to keep your toothbrush clean by storing it in either a toothbrush container built for travel or in a sealed-shut plastic sandwich-type bag. Your toothbrush gets clean at home because you rinse it after use and then leave it out to dry out. When you travel, you should place it in the container until you arrive and then you should remove it from the plastic bag/container to dry out.

If you forget your toothbrush—it’s easy to do—then you can use a washrag or even the tip of your finger. Simply apply a small amount of toothpaste to either a clean washrag or finger and scrub all the surfaces of your teeth. If you’ve also forgotten toothpaste, then a firm swish-out with water and a scrubbing sans toothpaste will work to rid your mouth of some bacteria, however as soon as you are able you should pick up a toothbrush and toothpaste.

If you have any questions or would like to schedule your next appointment for a routine checkup then call your dentist at Premier Smile today.

Fluoride: Nature’s Cavity Fighter

September 8th, 2018

People are becoming wary of chemicals, especially chemicals that get added to food and water. And in most cases, it’s a good thing to be wary of certain chemical additives; however, one such additive (considered a mineral) that should not be grouped with others is fluoride. Fluoride does get added to most community water supplies (In fact, fluoride has been added to water supplies in the United States for over seventy years). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has deemed the addition of fluoride to water supplies to be one of the ten great health achievements of the twentieth century. But fluoride is added to water supplies and certain fluoride toothpastes because it helps to prevent cavities in both children and adults. It helps the outer surfaces of the teeth (the hard, protective surface is called the enamel) be more resistant to acid attacks from the bacteria that cause tooth decay.

Fluoride is added to toothpaste and into community water supplies because it helps to rebuild weak tooth enamel—tooth enamel gets broken down and weakened for any number of reasons (It especially breaks down naturally as we age)—and the rebuilt enamel resists tooth decay.

Remember that it’s important to brush your teeth twice every day, and for two minutes. You should brush all the surfaces of your teeth, and, for adults and children over the age of six (children who are unable to spit out the toothpaste should not use an adult toothpaste) you should use a fluoride toothpaste with the ADA (American Dental Association) seal of approval on its packaging. A child who is too young to spit out toothpaste should be supervised while he or she brushes. A child who is unable to spit out toothpaste should use no more than a slight amount of toothpaste (Generally speaking, the amount of toothpaste required should be the size of a pea, and children younger than three should use toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice).

Remember also to schedule your next appointment with your dentist at Premier Smile. A regular dental checkup is an important component to quality oral health.

Proper Nutrition And Dental Health

April 8th, 2018

We all have probably heard that consuming overly-sugary foods and beverages can lead to tooth decay, but did you also know that your mouth is likely to be the first place to indicate signs of poor nutrition? It’s true. Evidence of poor nutrition is evident, usually, within the mouth before it shows in areas of the body. Everything you eat and drink has an impact, no matter how small or how brief, on your dental health.

Nutrition depends on many things; to consider nutrition per the recommended guidelines developed by the Department of Agriculture, a person’s nutrition depends on age, gender, level of activity, and other inherent health factors. This means that calories and other dietary restrictions are based on several different factors, and that no two people are exactly alike, but everyone’s diet should have balance and moderation. For instance, unless a person has certain dietary restrictions that prevent it, people should consume lots of fruits and vegetables. Also, grains are important—of course, again, this depends on dietary restrictions—and foods such as oatmeal, whole wheat bread, and brown rice are an especially important part of our diet. Dairy should be low-fat and limited to moderation, and foods that are rich in protein such as fish and skinless meat—remember that certain meats can be hard on the body and should be consumed in moderation—but also protein-rich foods such as legumes—i.e. beans and lentils.

While a diet is an incredibly important aspect to full body health, quality dental health depends also on several other factors that include: the frequency a person eats—regular snacking is not recommended, because it’s hard to keep the teeth clean—the combinations of foods a person consumes in one sitting, and any other conditions—gastrointestinal problems and systemic diseases such as diabetes—which may alter the way our bodies process food.

Remember, our mouths are one of many of the components to full body health, and oral health is not only about just twice daily brushings one once daily flossing—although these are very, very important components.

Halitosis

January 6th, 2018

Halitosis is the word for chronic bad breath. And if you are suffering from halitosis, then there’s no quick and easy remedy; mints and mouthwashes and extra brushing won’t alleviate the problem. Halitosis is not the same as morning breath, and it’s not bad breath caused from potent-smelling foods like garlic, onions, or tuna fish. It’s a possibly long-term condition, and because halitosis can oftentimes be a sign of a more serious condition, it should be checked out by your dentist at Premier Smile, immediately.

Causes of Halitosis

Halitosis could be a sign of a more serious condition, including a possible underlying dental issue; something not yet symptomatic. Halitosis could signal a cavity, or a pocket of thriving bacteria and the beginnings of gum disease—remember that in the initial stages of gum disease there are very few, if any, symptoms. Halitosis could also be the cause of an infection within the mouth, nose, or throat. Bacterial caused conditions such as strep throat could be the cause of halitosis. Other conditions such as a sinus infection could bring on halitosis, because bacteria feed on the mucous produced from the infection. Serious conditions, such as kidney disease, diabetes, and chronic acid reflux are also potential causes of halitosis—a good reason to get yourself checked!

What to do about Halitosis

Halitosis is not a forever condition, and in fact your dentist should be able to determine the cause of it after a checkup and a cleaning. If you are experiencing bad breath, you should first examine your everyday oral care routine: are you brushing twice daily for two minutes and flossing at least once? Are you drinking plenty of water—dry mouth is also an underlying cause for halitosis. If the answer is yes, then it’s time to pay a visit to your dentist at Premier Smile. If it turns out that the halitosis is dental caused, you will have your answer after an examination, but if it’s not caused by a dental condition, then your dentist can advise you as to how to proceed.

Wisdom Teeth

November 7th, 2017

Wisdom teeth are appropriately named, because they are a set of molars that don’t grow up through the gums until later in life. Usually, wisdom teeth begin to sprout when a person is between the ages of seventeen and twenty-one, although it varies—some people get them sooner, others later. Wisdom teeth can sometimes be helpful, because that extra set of molars helps us chew our food. Unfortunately, many people need to have their wisdom teeth removed, because there isn’t enough space for them in the mouth.

Problems of Wisdom Teeth

Oftentimes, wisdom teeth don’t have the room to grow. Because the molars develop so much later than other teeth, oftentimes well after a mouth has fully developed—sometimes after a dental appliance, such as braces, have already aligned the teeth—there isn’t room for these extra molars. And there’s no easy way to predict how the wisdom teeth will grow in the mouth. Sometimes wisdom teeth can become impacted (impacted means that a tooth is trapped beneath the gum line, possibly even in the jaw). If wisdom teeth grow too closely to other teeth, it’s possible that food debris can get trapped in the spaces between. Sometimes these tight spaces can be very difficult to keep clean. Sometimes they grow so close to the neighboring molar that it becomes difficult, if not practically impossible, to floss. And when the spaces between teeth are not cleaned, bacteria thrive; and, when bacteria are allowed to thrive, a mouth can suffer from conditions such as infection and gum disease. Also, when wisdom teeth grow too close to their neighboring molars, they can damage those other teeth, destroying the roots, or even damaging the bones in the jaw that support those teeth.

Removal

When wisdom teeth overcrowd, or when they do damage to a mouth, they should be removed. Your dentist at Premier Dental will be able to determine if there is a potential issue. You and your dentist can discuss possible treatments, or, when wisdom teeth don’t require immediate removal, a plan to monitor their growth. If you have any questions about wisdom teeth, your dentist at Premier Dental is ready to answer them.

Why We Floss

September 10th, 2017

We all know that flossing is important. But why? Why, daily, should we have to slip that strand of floss between our teeth, clean out the space down to the gum line? Don’t a toothbrush’s bristles get far enough into those narrow spaces? The number one reason to floss is to help to rid the surfaces of the teeth from harmful bacteria that can develop plaque, which, if allowed to thrive, will then harden into a substance called tartar. Tartar cannot be removed by twice-daily brushing and flossing. Bacteria that are allowed to thrive can cause chronic conditions such as gingivitis or the more severe periodontal disease. Bacteria allowed to thrive can be responsible for halitosis (bad breath).

How to Floss

Flossing is relatively simple, and if you are someone who doesn’t have a lot of experience (it’s estimated that over thirty percent of adults who are over the age of thirty don’t floss—at all) with a week’s worth of practicing you will have mastered the skill. First, start out with a strand of floss about 12-18 inches in length. (It doesn’t matter which type of floss you use; floss comes in numerous sizes, colors, and flavors—they all work!). Wrap the ends of the floss around your index fingers and work it into the space between two teeth. Slide the floss between the teeth keeping your hands at opposing angles that make the floss bend around the tooth—it should look like the letter C. It’s easiest to begin at a tooth at the edge of the mouth, or a tooth in the very center, so that you will remember which teeth you have already cleaned.

If you have issues with dexterity, there are appliances which can be used with just one hand. One such product is a soft plaque remover, which resembles something like a soft toothpick, and the other appliance is a flossing aid, which traps the ends of the floss between two prongs, and the flossing aid can be maneuvered over the spaces between the teeth, using just one hand.  To schedule your next dental checkup, call Premier Smile today.

Sizzlin' Summer Giveaway

April 28th, 2017

We are sure the weather will warm up and the rain will stop, leaving way for fun summer BBQ gatherings. We have the perfect way to entertain family and friends with this Traeger Texas Elite Grill, $100 Omaha Steak Gift card and basket of backyard fun and games (Total Value $1250).
Ways to enter to win:
1) Refer a friend/family member for 1 entry
2) Refer 2 friends/family members for 3 entries
3) Refer 3 friends/family members for 6 entries
4) Refer 4 or more friends and family members and receive an additional 3 entries for every referral
5) Submit an in office video testimonial for 5 entries

Contest runs April 1st through June 30th! If you have questions please don't hesitate to give us a call at 402-718-8737.

Raising Children's Oral Health Awareness in February!

February 17th, 2017

Premier Dental may be coming to a school near you! We have planned several school visits to promote Children's Dental Health Month and Oral Health Awareness! February has been named National Children's Health Month by the American Dental Association (ADA) in an effort to promote better dental health for children all over the country.

"What children eat and when they eat it may affect not only their general health, but also their oral health," said Dr. Piper Larson of Premier Dental. "Americans are consuming more and more sugary food and drinks than ever before. Energy drinks and junk foods have gradually replaced nutritious beverages and foods for many. February is a great opportunity for us to provide community support in the battle against sugar."

According to the NCCIH, about 30% of teenagers consume energy drinks on a regular basis. Many energy drinks contain as much as 25-50 g of simple sugars. There is also the safety factor that is question with these drinks.  Large amounts of caffeine and other additives pose other health risks as well.

Here at Premier Dental we like to refer parents and kids to the American Dental Association Guidelines to help reduce the risk of tooth decay:

  • Limit snacking between meals to healthy, low sugar options.
  • If you are going to consume sugary drinks or foods do so with meals when saliva production is high and this can help neutralize acid production.
  • Stick to sugarless gum after eating to increase saliva flow and assist in removing food particles from the mouth.
  • Think about what your child is drinking and increase their intake of water.
  • Stick to regularly scheduled dental appointments.

At Premier Dental and Premier Pediatric Dentistry we encourage all patients, regardless of age, to follow these guidelines along with daily brushing and flossing.

New Year New You Giveaway!

January 27th, 2017

We love to give things away--so we have decided to give away a package of health and beauty. You could win a new Fit Bit Charge, $200 Trader Joe's Gift Card, $200 Scheels Gift Card, $100 Indulgence Salon & Spa Gift Card along with a basket of goodies! The basket includes a fitness mat, water bottle, beach towel, exercise bands and much more!

How do you win? All you need to do to be entered is tell your friends and family about us. When they come in to visit us we will enter you into the drawing. Be sure they tell us that you referred them! And we promise we will provide them with the best customer service and dental care we can! Other ways to be entered: Review us on Google and/or Yelp and submit an in-office video testimonial. There is no limit on the number of entries you may have! Contest runs through March 31st, 2017.

July Newsletter

July 14th, 2016

Click here to view our latest newsletter: Premier July 2016

Opening Our Hearts This Holiday Season

November 29th, 2015

Opening Our Hearts This Holiday Season, family dentist omaha ne

Let me take you on a trip back in time. The year is 2004 and the Groves’ little family of three was about to change. Unbeknownst to them, their decision to become foster parents would soon set off a series of events that would ultimately take their family of three and turn it into a family of 12. After approximately 19 months of fostering brothers, Noah and Chase, they were given the opportunity to adopt them. This was only the beginning! In 2006 their phone rang with a call that the same birth mother had another child that she was unable to care for, and would they be interested in taking him in? Scott and Melissa Groves didn’t even have to think about it, the answer was a resounding YES! That same phone call came in a few more times over the following years and each time the Groves family opened their hearts and their home. Ultimately they welcomed eight biological brothers and one biological cousin into the fold.
Now fast forward to present day. As you can imagine, their household is a hive of activity. But what happens when one part of the foundation of this family falls ill? Melissa has been battling a blood clotting disorder and the resulting infection is potentially life threatening. Many treatments and two surgeries later, doctors were regrettably unsuccessful in restoring circulation in Melissa’s foot. The infection caused chronic pain and had immobilized this always-on-the-go mom. Then the news they feared came in early October. With all options exhausted and the infection threatening her life the decision was made that amputation was the only choice left. Shortly after the news came Melissa underwent surgery to remove her leg just below the knee. Melissa states, “Every day brings something new to learn and accept.” More than anything she is ready to hear the familiar sounds of her family and home life, that noise is a comfort to her and she’s ready to get back to it. When things get tough she says, “My kids, family, friends and my church all keep me going.” She reminds herself that, “God has a plan. Every time we thought we were done expanding our family God would say no, I have a plan. I keep thinking that this is the same, He has a plan.”
This holiday season our family here at Premier Dental has chosen to reach out to offer our support and services to the Groves in their time of need. We’ll be setting up an Angel Tree in our office that will be decorated with the Christmas wishes of the Groves family. At Premier Dental we are passionate about supporting our community and we encourage you, our patients, family, friends, and peers to do the same. Scott and Melissa Groves have opened their hearts and home to keep this family together and to provide them with love and a sense of belonging. We’re doing what we can to ease the stress of the holidays for their family and we’d greatly appreciate your support in doing so!
How Can I Help?
Monetary donations can be made directly to the family at: www.gofundme.com/theGroves.

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