Call us in the MORNING...we'll get you in TODAY—GUARANTEED!

Teeth Care Omaha NE

Cold/Flu Season and Dental Health

January 7th, 2019

Illness can wreak both mental and physical havoc on the body. And while the common cold and the flu bring the most noticeable symptoms to various parts of the circulatory system, it can also have a negative impact on our dental health.

Good hygiene is absolutely important when you have a cold or the flu. Did you know that the flu virus can survive for seventy-two hours? That means that your toothbrush is contagious with the virus even after you’ve gotten over it. So, don’t share your toothbrush with anyone during the cold and flu season (Although it’s best to keep to this rule year round). It’s probably important also to throw out the toothbrush once you begin to feel better. It can be hard to get rid of a toothbrush early, but you don’t want recontamination, nor do you want to spread it to anyone else with whom you share bathroom space. But it’s not all bad with your toothbrush. While you are sick the act of brushing your teeth can leave you with a reinvigorated feeling; it improves your outlook. Remember to keep to a schedule of brushing at least twice daily and flossing once.

One common symptom of illness is dehydration and dry mouth. You may experience dry mouth because of dehydration or even as an unfortunate side effect of certain medication—antihistamines, for example, are notorious for causing dry mouth. You want to drink lots of fluids while you are sick. Dry mouth can leave the teeth susceptible to a cavity. And choose the right fluids when you’re sick. Yes, sports drinks are a good balance in the body when you’re sick, and oftentimes are used to replenish the electrolyte storage in the body, but you’ll want to drink them in moderation, and remember to brush your teeth soon after consuming them.

Hopefully you remain healthy, cold-and-flu-free, this winter season, but if you don’t then remember to take care of yourself. The winter months are also a terrific time to come in and see your dentist at Premier Smile for a checkup.

Dental Emergencies While on Vacation. Plus, Travel Tips.

October 12th, 2018

Usually our dental health is not our first thought when we prepare for vacation. But the truth is that a dental emergency can happen at any time, and it would be entirely unfortunate to have to undergo a sore tooth or other mouth issue that could arise while you are on a beach somewhere, or at the top of a mountain. You could have to cancel the rest of your vacation if the situation was dire enough. That’s one reason why it’s important to have regular checkups; a good time to have checkup is right before you go on vacation. Your dentist at Premier Smile should notice a potential problem before one occurs; even if a patient has a mouth disease and that disease has not yet evolved to be symptomatic. One tip to remember is to keep your Premier Smile dentist’s phone number in the contacts on your phone so that you can call in the case of emergency.

Another travel tip is to remember to keep your toothbrush clean by storing it in either a toothbrush container built for travel or in a sealed-shut plastic sandwich-type bag. Your toothbrush gets clean at home because you rinse it after use and then leave it out to dry out. When you travel, you should place it in the container until you arrive and then you should remove it from the plastic bag/container to dry out.

If you forget your toothbrush—it’s easy to do—then you can use a washrag or even the tip of your finger. Simply apply a small amount of toothpaste to either a clean washrag or finger and scrub all the surfaces of your teeth. If you’ve also forgotten toothpaste, then a firm swish-out with water and a scrubbing sans toothpaste will work to rid your mouth of some bacteria, however as soon as you are able you should pick up a toothbrush and toothpaste.

If you have any questions or would like to schedule your next appointment for a routine checkup then call your dentist at Premier Smile today.

Cavities and Medication

August 4th, 2018

Did you know that it’s possible to get cavities later in life? It’s true. Too often we consider youth to be the only time during which we are prone to cavities. But, unfortunately, it’s also possible to get cavities later in life, especially after we’ve aged past middle age, and the number one cause is often dry mouth. There are other reasons, too—aging is a process that affects all aspects of our bodies. (Too often we consider the teeth to be different than the rest of the body).

Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging, and it is possible to have the condition treated. But it is also important that you check the side effects of your medications, and, in the event that there’s a possibility to adjust medications to alleviate dry mouth as a symptom, you should consult your primary physician. But know that it is a possible side-effect for more than 500 different medications; these medications are varied, but include medications for asthma, high cholesterol, pain medications, anxiety and depression medications, high blood pressure, and even common antihistamines. Your dentist at Premier Smile will be able to recommend several different methods to help alleviate the symptoms of dry mouth.

Remember when you experience the symptoms of dry mouth to keep hydrated. You should carry a water bottle with you when you go out, and drink water even at the times when you’re not thirsty. You can also use sugar-free gum—make sure it’s sugarless and without hard granulated crystals—to keep your mouth from going completely dry. And avoid drinks such as coffee and alcohol.

Remember that’s it’s very important to keep your teeth clean even when you’re older. You should brush your teeth twice daily—for at least two minutes—and floss at least once. And it’s imperative that you remember to visit your dentist, regularly, so that your dentist at Premier Smile can both clean your teeth and determine any possible changes in the mouth long before those changes become difficult problems.

Proper Nutrition And Dental Health

April 8th, 2018

We all have probably heard that consuming overly-sugary foods and beverages can lead to tooth decay, but did you also know that your mouth is likely to be the first place to indicate signs of poor nutrition? It’s true. Evidence of poor nutrition is evident, usually, within the mouth before it shows in areas of the body. Everything you eat and drink has an impact, no matter how small or how brief, on your dental health.

Nutrition depends on many things; to consider nutrition per the recommended guidelines developed by the Department of Agriculture, a person’s nutrition depends on age, gender, level of activity, and other inherent health factors. This means that calories and other dietary restrictions are based on several different factors, and that no two people are exactly alike, but everyone’s diet should have balance and moderation. For instance, unless a person has certain dietary restrictions that prevent it, people should consume lots of fruits and vegetables. Also, grains are important—of course, again, this depends on dietary restrictions—and foods such as oatmeal, whole wheat bread, and brown rice are an especially important part of our diet. Dairy should be low-fat and limited to moderation, and foods that are rich in protein such as fish and skinless meat—remember that certain meats can be hard on the body and should be consumed in moderation—but also protein-rich foods such as legumes—i.e. beans and lentils.

While a diet is an incredibly important aspect to full body health, quality dental health depends also on several other factors that include: the frequency a person eats—regular snacking is not recommended, because it’s hard to keep the teeth clean—the combinations of foods a person consumes in one sitting, and any other conditions—gastrointestinal problems and systemic diseases such as diabetes—which may alter the way our bodies process food.

Remember, our mouths are one of many of the components to full body health, and oral health is not only about just twice daily brushings one once daily flossing—although these are very, very important components.

Happy Holidays!

December 5th, 2017

The holiday season is a hard time for teeth; if for no other reason than the perpetual snacking: parties, an office get-together, gift boxes of candies, platters of cookies and other sugary treats, champagne and/or sugary ciders (beverages like Martinelli’s sparkling cider are often overlooked as being bad for teeth). The holiday season is a lot of fun. And, no, you don’t have to entirely abstain from sugary foods over the holiday season, but you do need to be mindful, and you will need to continue your daily oral care routine of brushing at least twice—sometimes more but we’ll get to that in a moment—and flossing at least once.

Being Mindful

There are so many delicious food options during the holiday season that it can be overwhelming. Remember, your teeth need adequate time to recover from eating and drinking beverages—all except for plain water. If you are snacking on delicious food all day everyday throughout the next month or so, then your teeth, and the natural systems your mouth has to fight against cavities—i.e. saliva—won’t be given adequate time to do the job.

Have a plan. If you are going to be attending a holiday party in the middle of the day—i.e. that yearly potluck-style party at the office where everyone brings in platters of cookies and other baked goods, candies—then pack with you a toothbrush and toothpaste. Clean your teeth after such an event. Yes, your mouth can handle quite a lot, but don’t overdo it. Brushing after the midafternoon party, for approximately two minutes, you can get your mouth back into shape.

Remember to avoid chewing hard candies, always. Not only can a hard candy potentially crack a tooth, it can remain stuck in the gaps between teeth and on a tooth’s surface, doing its sugary damage for long periods before finally being dissolved by saliva.

We hope you have a happy holiday season, and we hope that through all your enjoyments you will be mindful of your eating habits and keep to a quality oral care routine.

Why We Floss

September 10th, 2017

We all know that flossing is important. But why? Why, daily, should we have to slip that strand of floss between our teeth, clean out the space down to the gum line? Don’t a toothbrush’s bristles get far enough into those narrow spaces? The number one reason to floss is to help to rid the surfaces of the teeth from harmful bacteria that can develop plaque, which, if allowed to thrive, will then harden into a substance called tartar. Tartar cannot be removed by twice-daily brushing and flossing. Bacteria that are allowed to thrive can cause chronic conditions such as gingivitis or the more severe periodontal disease. Bacteria allowed to thrive can be responsible for halitosis (bad breath).

How to Floss

Flossing is relatively simple, and if you are someone who doesn’t have a lot of experience (it’s estimated that over thirty percent of adults who are over the age of thirty don’t floss—at all) with a week’s worth of practicing you will have mastered the skill. First, start out with a strand of floss about 12-18 inches in length. (It doesn’t matter which type of floss you use; floss comes in numerous sizes, colors, and flavors—they all work!). Wrap the ends of the floss around your index fingers and work it into the space between two teeth. Slide the floss between the teeth keeping your hands at opposing angles that make the floss bend around the tooth—it should look like the letter C. It’s easiest to begin at a tooth at the edge of the mouth, or a tooth in the very center, so that you will remember which teeth you have already cleaned.

If you have issues with dexterity, there are appliances which can be used with just one hand. One such product is a soft plaque remover, which resembles something like a soft toothpick, and the other appliance is a flossing aid, which traps the ends of the floss between two prongs, and the flossing aid can be maneuvered over the spaces between the teeth, using just one hand.  To schedule your next dental checkup, call Premier Smile today.

What Is A Cracked Tooth?

October 11th, 2016

Did you know that our teeth can be easily damaged? True story, teeth need to be well cared for and protected. But, there’s also unavoidable circumstances which can lead to tooth damage. Consider these symptoms: you feel sharp pain when you bite down, chewing, and the pain is only on one side of the mouth; the pain could either be localized to a tooth or area around the tooth, or the pain could be pervading throughout the teeth, gums, jaw, etc. on one side of the mouth. What then (in a healthy mouth, a mouth that hasn’t sustained recent injury, a well-cared for, cleaned mouth) could the pain be caused from? It’s possible that the problem could be a cracked tooth.

Causes of a cracked tooth

Teeth crack for the obvious reasons like injuries, or chewing on hard foods, but there are a few, lessor known reasons, some you may not realize are even happening within your mouth. Tooth grinding is one cause, and many people may not realize that they grind their teeth while they sleep. Also, you may chew foods with uneven pressure. It could also just be that your aging, that past fillings, etc. are breaking down, and the tooth’s structural integrity is no longer supported.

How to tell if a tooth is cracked

It’s difficult to know if painful symptoms are caused by a cracked tooth, because a crack may be too fine to see, or it may be in a location not easily found without the proper dental equipment. Regardless, it’s not something you will want to suffer through. Symptoms like these most often won’t just go away, and it could greatly affect your quality of life. It’s absolutely important to pay a visit to your dentist if you are in pain. If it’s determined to be not the cause of a cracked tooth, but of something more serious and more difficult to treat, early treatment is important.  If it is a cracked tooth, your dentist may treat it with a variety of methods, depending upon the severity of the damage.

Remember, don’t suffer through dental pain. Call us TODAY (402) 718-8737 to schedule your appointment today!

Cold Sore Solutions That Actually Work!

August 30th, 2016

Whether you call them cold sores or fever blisters, if you're among the more than 40% of Americans who regularly experience this inflammatory viral nuisance, you know they're anything but a joy to deal with. You've also probably heard of countless ways to deal with them, from over-the-counter remedies to treatment options that span generations. So what really works?

Well quite honestly what "works" when it comes to cold sores is management. And, specifically preventing, treating and eliminating the transmission of this most annoying of viruses. At Premier Dental we offer laser treatment for these viruses.

If you catch the lesion in time with laser treatment, you can prevent the cold sore from breaking out. As soon as you feel that tingling sensation that warns you of an oncoming sore, schedule an appointment for a laser treatment. If you already have a full blown sore, the laser will take away the discomfort and help it to dry up and heal much faster.

The herpes simplex virus that causes cold sores cannot be cured. After you get infected, the virus stays in your body for the rest of your life. If you get cold sores often, laser treatment can reduce the number of cold sores you get and how severe they are. It often happens that people will get cold sores that reoccur in the same spot every time. After being treated with a laser multiple times, there is a good chance that sore won't appear again in that spot.

What are the benefits of using a laser in treating cold sores?

  • Laser energy destroys the virus that causes the sore
  • Relief is immediate and profound
  • Helps prevent sores if treated once the lip starts tingling
  • Arrests the progression of the lesion after treatment
  • Treatment takes about 5-10 minutes and without anesthesia
  • After treatment, sores reoccur with less intensity and frequency at the same location

Cold Sore Prevention

The number one and number two causes are a weakened immune system, and exposure to rapidly changing weather. To tackle the weather, always keep your preferred brand of lip moisturizer with sunscreen on hand to protect your lips from weather's effect on your lips. And to boost your immune system, be sure to get enough sleep and find ways to combat stress in your life. Also, as with most things in life, what's good for our waistlines is good for our immune system. Here are some good dietary suggestions for cold sore sufferers:

  1. Eat Raw, Alkalizing Foods: Fruits and vegetables are super-good for you.
  2. Cruciferous Vegetables: Clinical studies are beginning to suggest that veggies like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and kale are of great benefit to cold sore sufferers.
  3. Avoid Arginine: Cold-sores need the amino acid arginine to grow, so if you can limit the excess intake of this amino acid, you may be able to keep frequent outbreaks at bay. Nuts, chocolate, oats, and some protein shakes are high in arginine.

Cold Sore Treatment and Remedies

Preventing a cold sore from appearing is indeed your best medicine, and if you pay attention to what your body tells you, it is possible to dramatically reduce outbreaks. When a cold-sore does gift you with its presence, here are a few things you can do to minimize its pain, size and duration.

  1. Laser It! At the first sign of tingling, call Premier Dental at 402-718-8737 and schedule a 10 minute appointment for laser treatment.
  2. Ice It! Can't get to the office right away, when you feel that first sign of tingling wrap an ice cube in a paper-towel and place it on your lip where you feel the cold-sore coming on. Often two back-to-back applications of an ice cube until it melts can help reduce the pain and swelling that accompanies the sore.
  3. Slather? Not Now, But Later. Cold sores love warm, moist environments, and this is precisely the environment you present to a cold-sore when you slather it in cream for days on end. You're best to let it dry out to the point where it is no longer painful, and then begin applying cream or lip balm to minimize splitting. As the cold sore resolves itself, it's best to keep your lips moist to prevent bleeding, which also aids in the healing at this stage.

Eliminate Transmission of Cold Sores

Avoid sharing food utensils, towels, toothbrushes, or any other item that could come in contact with your mouth. Also, be sure to avoid touching the cold sore and then later touching your eyes or genital area. In fact, your best course of action is to avoid touching your mouth at all during an outbreak, and not again until the scab has dropped off completely. And healed over. This can take some weeks, as you know. Kissing, and other aspects of intimacy that involve your mouth should be avoided entirely. Wash your hands often-this cannot be stressed enough to avoid spreading the virus.

Having a cold sore is not the end of the world. Nine out of 10 of all people get at least one cold sore in their life, so there is no need to hide in the closet. Understand your triggers, find a solution that works, don't spread the virus, and stay healthy!

Premier Dental's Third Annual Dentistry from the Heart

August 25th, 2016

Dr. Dan Beninato will host Premier Dental's Third Annual Dentistry From The Heart (DFTH) event – providing a FREE day of dental care to more than 125 residents.

Dentistry From The Heart patients travel from across Nebraska and Iowa every year to Premier Dental for the annual free day of dentistry, happening on Saturday, August 27th, 2016.

In 2001, Dentistry From The Heart started with New Port Richey dentist Dr. Vincent Monticciolo as a way to giving back to the community and provide aid to the growing number of Americans without dental insurance. Since its inception, Dentistry From The Heart has grown to include over 200 annual events worldwide and provided more than 100,000 people with free dental care services.

Annually, Dr. Beninato and his team of dentists, volunteers and sponsors provide patients with a free extraction, filling or cleaning. This is the third annual event for Dr. Beninato, who has donated over $90,00 worth of free dental care to more than 200 patients. The goal this year is to treat 190 patients and give away $75,000 in free dental care. Services will be provided on a first come first serve basis, guaranteeing the first 125 patients to be seen.

“It is our favorite day of the year at Premier Dental,” said Dr. Beninato. “The services provided by Dentistry From The Heart helps more than just a patient’s teeth, it gives them a renewed reason to smile.”

If you are looking for a way to help out in the community and pay it forward join us on Saturday, August 27th between 9 am and 2 pm for the American Red Cross Blood Drive. To register please visit www.redcross.org/give-blood and enter donor code PremierDental. All presenting donors on Saturday who register with an email will receive a $5 Amazon gift card from the American Red Cross!

Help spread the word and Free smiles this Saturday, August 27th, 2016 from 8am until 3 pm with registration beginning at 7:30 am at Premier Dental located at 17110 Lakeside Hills Plaza, Omaha, NE  68130. For more information please visit www.dentistryfromtheheart.org. CONTACT:  info@premiersmile.com

Dentistry From The Heart is a registered non-profit organization that provides free dental work for people those in need. Every year, Dentistry From The Heart events contribute millions of dollars in free dentistry and help more than 100,000 patients across the United States and around the world. For more information, visit www.dentistryfromtheheart.org

The Benefits of Fluoride

August 4th, 2016

The Benefits of Fluoride, Family Dentist Omaha

Why is it that so often when we speak of healthy teeth we also mention fluoride?  It’s because fluoride fights cavities naturally, being a natural mineral found in lakes, oceans, rivers, etc.  Because of it’s beneficial properties, in most places its also added to the drinking water.

Fluoride protects the teeth by making the outer surface of a tooth (this surface is called the enamel) more resistant to the acids in our foods and beverages, which reduces the chance of chronic oral problems such as tooth decay.  Our tooth enamel breaks down with age, with the foods we eat, with sugary beverages, etc.  Fluoride then helps rebuild a weakened enamel to the threat of tooth decay.

While fluoride is found in most water supplies in the United States—about seventy-five percent—it’s also found in most toothpastes.  A quality fluoride toothpaste is an essential to the battle against tooth decay.  Dentists recommend a fluoride toothpaste, because when fluoride is applied to the surfaces of the teeth there is a twenty-five percent greater chance at not contracting cavities—this, of course, is variable due to other factors such as diet, etc.

Make sure to brush your teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste, and floss at least once everyday.  Children of any age may use a toothpaste with fluoride, however there are amount restrictions with the age and ability of the child.  For children who cannot spit out the toothpaste, a very small amount of toothpaste, no more than the size of a grain of rice should be used.

When a child is able to spit out the toothpaste reliably, the amount of toothpaste can be upped to an amount similar to the size of a pea.  There are also mouthwashes that contain fluoride, however a child under the age of six may be more likely to swallow the mouthwash than to swish it about his or her mouth, so mouthwashes should only be used by adults and older children, as mouthwashes can contain other substances which are not healthy if ingested completely.

Regular check ups with your dentist—recommended twice yearly—and a consistent schedule of oral hygiene should keep your mouth healthy and free of gum disease.

Please contact Premier Dental for all of your dental needs today!

Mouthguards

June 5th, 2016

Throughout the seasons both kids and adults participate in team sports which can be a detriment to our teeth.  What do baseball/softball, football, hockey, basketball and boxing all have in common?  All these sports contribute significantly to the amount of dental injuries dentists see every single year.  The problem with most of these injuries is that it’s almost entirely preventable with the proper use of a mouth guard.  Mouthguards are required in some sports and not in others, but it has been proven that mouth guards significantly reduce the amount of dental injuries.

One reason that mouthguards often are not put into proper use is that they can be uncomfortable.  On the youth football field, you will often see the kids chewing on the edges of mouthguards instead of seating them firmly against their teeth.  However, if the mouthguards were more properly fit they would be more comfortable.  A poorly fit mouthguard can make it difficult to breath, because it either is fit too far back on the teeth toward the throat, or, in the case of a loosely fit mouth guard, it may require the use of both the upper and lower teeth to hold the mouth guard in place, thereby closing off the mouth for air.  Obviously this can make breathing difficult when someone is working hard on the playing field.

There are three different types of mouthguards.  Firstly, and the least most recommended mouthguard, are stock mouthguards, which can be purchased at most sporting goods stores.  Stock mouthguards cannot be molded to the teeth.  Secondly, the most common type of mouthguard, referred to as a boil-and-bite mouthguard, is molded to the teeth after it has been softened in boiling water, and, once softened, the person who will be wearing the mouthguard, will bite down into the mouthguard where the material will form around the teeth.  The last type of mouthguard is a custom-made mouthguard, a mouthguard which has been built by a qualified dentist in accordance with the dental history and needs of the patient..  Regardless of the style of mouthguard that you choose, if you are concerned with a proper fit, visit your dentist.  Your dentist can help you to achieve a proper fit and hopefully it will do its job in preventing any possible sports-related dental emergencies.

If you are looking for a custom mouthguard please contact Premier Dental today!

The Right Toothbrush

April 10th, 2016

There are hundreds of types of toothbrushes.  Toothbrushes range in shape, firmness, features, and even mechanical or manual.  With so many options, what toothbrush will work best for you?  One option is to visit your dentist, or ask at your next appointment.  Your dentist can direct you to a toothbrush that will work great for your mouth.  But, what if you are not able to visit the dentist soon, and you’re standing in front of an entire aisle of toothbrushes, trying to decide on a type?  Here’s a few things to consider if you are looking for your next, best toothbrush.

Firstly, consider the firmness of the bristles.  Toothbrushes often come in bristle hardness determined at firm, medium, and soft.  Most people will want to use a medium to soft bristled toothbrush, as a firm-bristled toothbrush may do damage to the teeth and the gums.  Then consider the head shape.  Toothbrush head shape and bristle shape differ widely by brand.  Pick a toothbrush that you’ll feel comfortable using, and also look for the ADA—American Dental Association—seal on the package, as this will indicate that this brush meets or exceeds the standards of the ADA.  Also, if you are choosing between a mechanical brush and a manual one, there are a few things to consider.  Firstly, if you are someone who has difficulty using a toothbrush to clean all areas of the teeth, then maybe a mechanical toothbrush, which usually has some type of spinning or vibrating head, will help you to clean the surfaces of the teeth.  A mechanical toothbrush is also a good choice for children, because a child may find the toothbrush to be fun to use, and it will hopefully increase the likelihood of developing a good brushing routine.

A toothbrush isn’t everything, however.  Even if you have the best toothbrush equipment made, you can still brush your teeth and gums too hard, removing enamel and damaging gum tissue.  So, brush regularly, clean the surface of the teeth, removing that unwanted plaque, but don’t overdo it.  If you have any questions about toothbrushes, or the proper way in which you can use them, make an appointment with your dentist.

Visit Premier Smiles for all of your oral health care needs! Omaha's Best Dentist!

Mouthwash-Oral Health

February 7th, 2016

In addition to your normal routine of brushing twice daily and flossing at least once, mouthwash could be an important component to your oral health.  Mouthwash freshens breath, but it can also be used for a variety of other reasons.  Mouthwash can help to prevent tooth decay, prevent or fight gingivitis, even slow the speed at which tartar builds upon the teeth, and, best of all, most mouthwashes are available without a prescription.  The main thing to look for in a quality mouthwash is the ADA (American Dental Association) Seal on the packaging.  The ADA Seal means that the product has been tested, and, not only does it work as advertised, but it’s also safe to use.  The ADA tests the product under predetermined guidelines for effectiveness and safety.

sleep apnea treatment omaha ne

Mouthwash-Oral Health

If you are unsure if you need a mouthwash, consult your dentist.  There are two types of mouthwashes: therapeutic and cosmetic.  Cosmetic mouthwashes leave the mouth with a pleasant taste and also control or reduce bad breath.  It wont deal with the causes of bad breath—bacteria within the mouth, and it wont help to prevent cavities, plaque, or gingivitis.  Therapeutic mouthwashes will help control bacteria, even reduce plaque, cavities, and fight gingivitis.  Some therapeutic mouthwashes also contain fluoride, which will help to prevent tooth decay.  If you are using a therapeutic mouthwash to prevent bad breath for any prolonged period of time, it may be important to visit your dentist to determine the underlying cause of the bad breath.

It doesn’t matter which action you perform at the sink in a normal tooth cleaning routine.  You can brush, floss, or swish with a mouthwash first, it’s the culmination of the three actions that will clean the teeth.  The manufacturer may also recommend on the packaging the proper time to use the product.  Also, it’s important not to give mouthwashes to children under the age of six, because they may swallow the rinse, and some rinses contain fluorides, which shouldn’t be swallowed.  And, always follow the manufacturers instructions on how much mouthwash you should use.

Proper Brushing Techniques

August 11th, 2015

Proper Brushing Techniques - Teeth Care, Family Dentist Omaha NE

Brushing your teeth properly removes the food particles and bacteria that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. However, you do not want to scrub your teeth or gums heavily. A heavy hand can lead to tooth and gum erosion, as Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our staff see all too often.

You should also use a soft bristle toothbrush to avoid damaging the surface of your teeth. Make sure the head of the brush fits in your mouth, because if it is too large you will not be able to reach all tooth surfaces. Follow these steps to ensure you are brushing properly.

  1. Use a small amount of toothpaste on your brush. The recommendation is a pea-sized amount or thin strip on the bristles.
  2. Hold your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the surface of your teeth, angling towards your gums. Use a circular motion on all exterior tooth surfaces, and avoid back-and-forth “scrub” brushing.
  3. Once you have cleaned the outer surfaces, hold the brush vertically and clean the inner teeth surfaces — the side of your teeth that face your tongue. Do not forget the inner surfaces of your front teeth.
  4. Finally, finish by cleaning all the chewing surfaces of your teeth. You need to maintain a gentle touch, but make sure you get into the full depth of your molars. The entire process should take about two minutes.

Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our staff recommend changing your toothbrush every three to four months for best results. Do not forget to clean your tongue, which helps remove excess bacteria from your mouth. Special brushes are available just for cleaning your tongue, and they are easy to use.

Proper care of your teeth also requires flossing on a regular basis. Flossing can be performed before or after you brush. Following up with a quality mouthwash will provide you with even more protection. Do not be afraid to ask the Premier Dental team for tips on proper brushing and flossing.

sesame logoWebsite Powered by Sesame 24-7