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Teeth Extractions Omaha NE

Links Between Diabetes and Dental Health

December 9th, 2018

Diabetes is a difficult disease for the entire body; it takes a toll on everything, including dental health. Diabetes, like other types of systemic disease, can increase the risk of dental disease. Practicing quality dental health is a necessary component to both quality oral health as well as disease management. Diabetes can be responsible for tooth loss—according to the American Dental Association, diabetes can be responsible for total tooth loss—but when quality dental health is put at a premium, including routine cleaning both at home and at the dentist’s office at Premier Smile, the risk of total tooth loss and other dental disease is lessened.

First Signs of Gum Disease?

Bleeding gums is a likely symptom of disease. Gums that bleed when you brush or floss could be a sign of gum disease. Thankfully, however, it doesn’t mean that the symptoms cannot be reversed. In its earlies stages, gum disease is treatable with quality oral care—twice daily quality brushings, and flossing once—and through dietary restriction. Limiting sugar in a diet, etc. When a person has diabetes, fluctuating blood sugars can increase the likelihood of gum disease.

Dry Mouth and Infection

Diabetes can cause symptoms of dry mouth. And saliva is responsible for clearing away sugar and other food debris from the teeth. Infection is a common condition among people with diabetes because diabetes decreases the immune system. A condition called thrush, which is a type of yeast infection within the mouth, a white, patchy covering. The yeast in the mouth feed on the sugars, and, thriving, can unfortunately leave a person suffering the condition with a persistent bad taste. Infections may also be as simple as a common mouth sore. When a person has a compromised immune system his or her body has a difficult time healing cuts and sores, etc. And a sore in the mouth, however simple, may not heal for a long time.

If you have any questions about the complications of diabetes and dental health, or if you are ready to schedule your next appointment with your dentist at Premier Smile, then call today.

Holiday Candy Season… Survival Guide

November 8th, 2018

Halloween has come and gone, but that doesn’t mean that it’s the end of the candy season. There are plenty of opportunities to imbibe sweets—both of the candy and pastry/cookie variety—throughout the next few months. And while those sweets are delicious and fun, there are many reasons to either consume in moderation or, in some cases, avoid some sweets entirely. Here’s why…

Sugar is an enemy to teeth, but it’s not the sugar, it’s the bacteria which feed on the sugar. The bacteria in your mouth love sugar, probably even more than you do, and as bacteria consume sugar they produce a weak acid that harms teeth. That acid is the cause of cavities.

If You’re Gonna Eat Candy Then Eat…

Chocolate! In moderation chocolate is one of the better types of candy for your teeth (there is absolutely NO candy that is actually good for your teeth). The reason? Because chocolate washes from the teeth. Some types of candies form a film or remain sticky, but chocolate can be washed away by saliva and water. But that isn’t to say that there is no damage done: the bacteria are still provided sugar and the teeth should be cleaned. And if you’re going to eat chocolate, then know that most brands of non-milk chocolate are lower in overall sugar than milk chocolate.

Sticky and Gummy (Candy, Carmel Apples, and the Like).

Try to stay away from sweet treats that are sticky or gummy. These types of sweets are more difficult to remove–some hardier-types can hide between the teeth even after a vigorous brushing (for instance, if you are going to consume popcorn balls you should floss immediately because some of the kernels can become tightly wedged between the teeth)—and the long length of time it takes to dissolve or remove the sugar from the mouth gives the bacteria more time to consume the sugars and produce harmful acids.

Have a wonderful start to the holiday season, and enjoy the sweet treats, but remember to enjoy them in moderation, and to clean your teeth whenever possible.

Wisdom Teeth

November 7th, 2017

Wisdom teeth are appropriately named, because they are a set of molars that don’t grow up through the gums until later in life. Usually, wisdom teeth begin to sprout when a person is between the ages of seventeen and twenty-one, although it varies—some people get them sooner, others later. Wisdom teeth can sometimes be helpful, because that extra set of molars helps us chew our food. Unfortunately, many people need to have their wisdom teeth removed, because there isn’t enough space for them in the mouth.

Problems of Wisdom Teeth

Oftentimes, wisdom teeth don’t have the room to grow. Because the molars develop so much later than other teeth, oftentimes well after a mouth has fully developed—sometimes after a dental appliance, such as braces, have already aligned the teeth—there isn’t room for these extra molars. And there’s no easy way to predict how the wisdom teeth will grow in the mouth. Sometimes wisdom teeth can become impacted (impacted means that a tooth is trapped beneath the gum line, possibly even in the jaw). If wisdom teeth grow too closely to other teeth, it’s possible that food debris can get trapped in the spaces between. Sometimes these tight spaces can be very difficult to keep clean. Sometimes they grow so close to the neighboring molar that it becomes difficult, if not practically impossible, to floss. And when the spaces between teeth are not cleaned, bacteria thrive; and, when bacteria are allowed to thrive, a mouth can suffer from conditions such as infection and gum disease. Also, when wisdom teeth grow too close to their neighboring molars, they can damage those other teeth, destroying the roots, or even damaging the bones in the jaw that support those teeth.

Removal

When wisdom teeth overcrowd, or when they do damage to a mouth, they should be removed. Your dentist at Premier Dental will be able to determine if there is a potential issue. You and your dentist can discuss possible treatments, or, when wisdom teeth don’t require immediate removal, a plan to monitor their growth. If you have any questions about wisdom teeth, your dentist at Premier Dental is ready to answer them.

Premier Dental's Third Annual Dentistry from the Heart

August 25th, 2016

Dr. Dan Beninato will host Premier Dental's Third Annual Dentistry From The Heart (DFTH) event – providing a FREE day of dental care to more than 125 residents.

Dentistry From The Heart patients travel from across Nebraska and Iowa every year to Premier Dental for the annual free day of dentistry, happening on Saturday, August 27th, 2016.

In 2001, Dentistry From The Heart started with New Port Richey dentist Dr. Vincent Monticciolo as a way to giving back to the community and provide aid to the growing number of Americans without dental insurance. Since its inception, Dentistry From The Heart has grown to include over 200 annual events worldwide and provided more than 100,000 people with free dental care services.

Annually, Dr. Beninato and his team of dentists, volunteers and sponsors provide patients with a free extraction, filling or cleaning. This is the third annual event for Dr. Beninato, who has donated over $90,00 worth of free dental care to more than 200 patients. The goal this year is to treat 190 patients and give away $75,000 in free dental care. Services will be provided on a first come first serve basis, guaranteeing the first 125 patients to be seen.

“It is our favorite day of the year at Premier Dental,” said Dr. Beninato. “The services provided by Dentistry From The Heart helps more than just a patient’s teeth, it gives them a renewed reason to smile.”

If you are looking for a way to help out in the community and pay it forward join us on Saturday, August 27th between 9 am and 2 pm for the American Red Cross Blood Drive. To register please visit www.redcross.org/give-blood and enter donor code PremierDental. All presenting donors on Saturday who register with an email will receive a $5 Amazon gift card from the American Red Cross!

Help spread the word and Free smiles this Saturday, August 27th, 2016 from 8am until 3 pm with registration beginning at 7:30 am at Premier Dental located at 17110 Lakeside Hills Plaza, Omaha, NE  68130. For more information please visit www.dentistryfromtheheart.org. CONTACT:  info@premiersmile.com

Dentistry From The Heart is a registered non-profit organization that provides free dental work for people those in need. Every year, Dentistry From The Heart events contribute millions of dollars in free dentistry and help more than 100,000 patients across the United States and around the world. For more information, visit www.dentistryfromtheheart.org

Root Canal or Extraction?

March 30th, 2016

Patients today have more options than ever before to treat their teeth. Understanding your choices and their impact on your future dental health and lifestyle is important. Read on to learn why nothing is as good as your natural tooth and get simple tips for saving your teeth!

Saving a natural tooth through endodontic treatment (root canal) should always be the first choice for the best health and cosmetic results. There are many advantages to saving your natural tooth:

  • Efficient chewing
  • Normal biting force, so you can continue to eat your favorite foods
  • Maintains a natural appearance
  • Limits the need for more costly, ongoing dental work

What to avoid

  • Never choose extraction because you think it will be cheaper! When a natural tooth is extracted, it must be replaced with an artificial tooth to prevent other teeth from shifting, and to prevent future dental problems. The cost of a denture, bridge or implant, plus the extraction, often is higher than the cost of an endodontic procedure that would save the tooth for years to come. Most dental insurance plans cover endodontic treatment.
  • Never choose extraction because you think root canal treatment will be painful! Modern techniques and effective anesthesia make root canal treatment virtually painless. In fact, discomfort after the procedure is generally greater with tooth extraction. Patients who have experienced root canal treatment are six times more likely to describe it as "painless" than those patients who have not had a root canal.
  • Never choose extraction because you think it will be quicker! Endodontic treatments generally require one to two visits lasting less than an hour each. An extraction requires one visit, but the denture, bridge or implant will require several additional visits with your dentist.

Root Canal Awareness Week

March 29th, 2016

Root Canal Awareness Week begins on March 27th and continues on until April 2nd. Root Canal Awareness Week, established by the American Association of Endodontists (AAE), was created to educate the public about misconceptions about root canal treatments and the true benefits of this virtually painless procedure. Root canal treatment saves more than 16 million natural teeth each year!

Root Canals

Endodontic treatment treats the inside of the tooth, endodontic treatment is necessary when the pulp becomes inflamed or infected. The inflammation or infection can have a variety of causes; deep decay, repeated dental procedures on the tooth, faulty crowns, or a crack or chip in the tooth. In addition, trauma to a tooth may cause pulp damage even if the tooth has no visible chips or cracks. If pulp or inflammation or infection is left untreated, it can cause pain or lead to an abscess.

Common Endodontic Symptoms

Patients may need endodontic treatment, including root canals, if they experience any of the following symptoms:

  • prolonged dental sensitivity to heat or cold
  • tenderness of teeth to touch and chewing
  • facial or oral swelling

Why do wisdom teeth need to be removed?

September 22nd, 2015

Why do wisdom teeth need to be removed? - Oral Surgery Teeth Extractions Omaha NE

Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team at Premier Dental get this question a lot. Wisdom teeth are the last teeth to come in, once young people get their adult teeth. Because they are the last teeth to break through the gums, they are often called the third molars. There are four wisdom teeth: two on each side of the top and bottom of the mouth.

There is no hard-and-fast rule that says everyone must have the wisdom teeth removed. There are certain situations in which they either cause problems directly, or create a situation where there is a greater likelihood problems will arise eventually.

Impacted wisdom teeth

If Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team say you have a soft tissue impaction, it means your wisdom tooth is covered by gum tissue that is preventing it from erupting — most likely because your mouth is too small to provide the tooth with the room it needs to emerge.

The term “partial bony impaction” means that gum tissue is covering the wisdom tooth, but part of the jaw bone is also covering it, in which case there is no room in your mouth for the tooth to erupt. The opposite end of this spectrum is a complete bony impaction, where the wisdom tooth is completely covered by gum tissue and the jawbone, which prevent it from ever erupting.

The importance of removing impacted wisdom teeth

Dentists often want to remove impacted wisdom teeth because of the likelihood that they will cause problems, or because a problem already exists. One such problem is pericoronitis, an acute abscess that affects partially impacted wisdom teeth. Food, bacteria, and other mouth debris can become lodged under the gum flap that covers the wisdom tooth, which prevents it from erupting. Pericoronitis symptoms include pain, swelling, and the presence of an abscess.

Regular dental checkups will enable your dentist to keep an eye on your wisdom teeth, especially if they have some type of impaction. Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke and our team at Premier Dental typically recommend removal of impacted wisdom teeth because of the likelihood that severe infections such as pericoronitis will develop.

If you have any questions about wisdom teeth, or if you would like to schedule an appointment with Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke, please give us a call at our convenient Omaha, NE office!

Are dental implants painful? What You Need to Know

September 8th, 2015

Are dental implants painful? What You Need to Know -  Dental Implants Omaha NE

Whether it is the result of tooth decay, gum disease, or injury, millions of people suffer tooth loss. Dental implants provide a strong replacement tooth root for fixed replacement teeth that are designed to match your natural teeth. Of course, there is one question all patients have about dental implants: are they painful?

Dental implant placement is performed under local or general anesthesia and is not considered a painful procedure. However, if the surgery is more complicated and involves bone or tissue grafts, there may be slightly more discomfort and swelling. At the same time, every patient has a different threshold for pain, so what may bother one person may not bother another. If you experience any pain from dental implants, there are several things can do to relive it.

Relieving Pain from Dental Implants

1. The initial healing phase can last up to seven to ten days. Over-the-counter painkillers such as Tylenol, Ibuprofen, and Motrin work well to alleviate any pain or discomfort you may experience. However, only take these if instructed to by Drs. Beninato, Larson, Bost, Butler, and Ebke.

2. Once you leave our Omaha, NE office, you can reduce inflammation and any swelling to your cheek or lip by holding an ice-pack on your face over the implant area.

3. Your gum will be tender for the first few days. We often recommended that you bathe your gums with warm salt water.

4. Steer clear of crusty or hard foods for the first day or two. Ice cream, yogurt, and other soft foods are ideal as your gums will be tender.

5. Dental implants are a relatively straightforward oral procedure. Many people take time off from work to have dental implant surgery, and then return to regular activities. However, if you are feeling any pain or discomfort, there is nothing wrong with taking the day off, relaxing, and putting your feet up.

There is typically no severe post-operative pain with dental implants. When most people return for a follow-up appointment about two weeks later, they often say that getting a dental implant was one of the least painful procedures they’ve experienced.

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