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Dental Care For Children Omaha NE

Did you know that it is important to start cleaning a child’s teeth as early as infancy?  Bacteria, brought about by the sugars in the milk, can build up in a child’s mouth before teeth have even begun to sprout from the child’s gums, so it is important at this young age to clean the gums with a damp rag regularly.  As soon as a child’s teeth begin to appear they can begin to decay.  Getting a child in the habit of quality oral care is also important at this stage; good habits can begin early and be lasting for the child.

A child should sprout his or her first tooth between the ages of six and eight months‑some children, however, wont get their first teeth for twelve months or more.  When a child has his or her first tooth it is important to begin to clean the tooth with a child’s size toothbrush.  Use a small amount of toothpaste that contains fluoride—think pea-sized amount—on the toothbrush and brush the tooth or teeth both back and forth (sawing motion) along the tops of the teeth and in circular motions over the fronts of the teeth.  At this age it is still important to brush a child’s teeth twice everyday, morning and night.

After the age of three, and the child has begun to spit out their toothpaste into the sink, it is a good idea to teach them to brush his or her own teeth.  Make sure that the child does not swallow the toothpaste and it is best to continue to supervise his or her progress.

Another important aspect of dental care for children is to have visited the dentist by their first birthday.  Not only is it important to have a child’s teeth cleaned and checked, the first dental visit begins a relationship in the child’s mind with the dentist.  The world is full of adults that are fearful of the dentist, and if a child is exposed to the dentist early, and he or she has a positive experience, he or she will be on a path to good oral care for a lifetime.

Did you know that it is important to start cleaning a child’s teeth as early as infancy?  Bacteria, brought about by the sugars in the milk, can build up in a child’s mouth before teeth have even begun to sprout from the child’s gums, so it is important at this young age to clean the gums with a damp rag regularly.  As soon as a child’s teeth begin to appear they can begin to decay.  Getting a child in the habit of quality oral care is also important at this stage; good habits can begin early and be lasting for the child.

A child should sprout his or her first tooth between the ages of six and eight months‑some children, however, wont get their first teeth for twelve months or more.  When a child has his or her first tooth it is important to begin to clean the tooth with a child’s size toothbrush.  Use a small amount of toothpaste that contains fluoride—think pea-sized amount—on the toothbrush and brush the tooth or teeth both back and forth (sawing motion) along the tops of the teeth and in circular motions over the fronts of the teeth.  At this age it is still important to brush a child’s teeth twice everyday, morning and night.

After the age of three, and the child has begun to spit out their toothpaste into the sink, it is a good idea to teach them to brush his or her own teeth.  Make sure that the child does not swallow the toothpaste and it is best to continue to supervise his or her progress.

Another important aspect of dental care for children is to have visited the dentist by their first birthday.  Not only is it important to have a child’s teeth cleaned and checked, the first dental visit begins a relationship in the child’s mind with the dentist.  The world is full of adults that are fearful of the dentist, and if a child is exposed to the dentist early, and he or she has a positive experience, he or she will be on a path to good oral care for a lifetime.

And if you have a medical flex savings account, now is the time to use it or you lose it.